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New Revised Standard Version Updated Edition (NRSVue)


R. Mansfield
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Below I am pasting my grossly oversimplified overview of the lineage of some English translations. So I would say that ESV is in the same family or group of translations as both RSV and NRSV. My understanding is that the ESV came about because some folks were unhappy with certain translation choices in the RSV, like young woman vs. virgin in Isaiah, and maybe also disagreement with the extent of gender-inclusive language used in the NRSV. That said, I am not sure why they felt that NASB 1995 revision was not sufficient to cover any of their perceived shortcomings in these respects. Maybe they wanted more dynamic equivalence than NASB but less than NIV? One day I hope to take the good advice above and read the entirety of the translator notes for all of these versions (and more), and maybe that will help me to understand better what the rationales were. These kinds of questions really are pretty interesting to me, but it would still take me quite a bit of strong coffee to make any real headway.

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@docdaveI think one of the main things prompting the development of the ESV was the need for a freely available, non-copyrighted version of the Bible that could be used on the internet. ESV was freely available, and its wide use and adoption by some many today indicates it was a successful strategy.

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a bit off-topic: there is only one way to get rid of all translations: learn Hebrew and eventually Greek. Bad for Accordance, the can no longer sale transaltion variants. But good for the budget and family: buy some flowers.😀

 

I'm happy with my Koren Tanach and a Hebrew translation (Delitzsch).

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On 8/25/2021 at 2:45 PM, docdave said:

I will be very excited to get my hands on the updated edition! Thanks Rick, for sharing the news and the informative pdf. As a relative newcomer to Accordance, this made me wonder - If I have the current NRSV in Accordance and someday, after it becomes available, I upgrade to the updated edition, would I then have both editions or would the old one vanish? 

 

You would retain both versions as they are distinctly different translation. Accordance users who bought earlier versions of the NASB, NIV, NLT, HCSB, etc. still have access to the old versions as well as the new one.

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On 8/29/2021 at 1:24 AM, Joe Weaks said:

If they did a thorough job of abandoning so many archaic terms (ark, pestilence, gird, fornication, fowler…), then it will surely replace the CEB as my primary English translation.

 

Hey, Fowler is my middle name! Not kidding: Richard Fowler Mansfield. If they change the word, how will I be able to tell people that the Bible speaks of me?

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On 8/29/2021 at 10:09 PM, Daniel Wagner said:

Sorry, my ignorance. I thought there was a path from RSV to NRSV to ESV. However, it does seem like every new translation is an

answer to something that was supposedly wrong with previous version or competing work. 

 

Both the ESV and NRSV are revisions to the RSV. The NRSV came first, but they are wholly separate projects.

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1 hour ago, mgvh said:

@docdaveI think one of the main things prompting the development of the ESV was the need for a freely available, non-copyrighted version of the Bible that could be used on the internet. ESV was freely available, and its wide use and adoption by some many today indicates it was a successful strategy.

Makes sense to make it freely available, but I was thinking ESV is copyrighted by the publisher?

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1 hour ago, R. Mansfield said:

 

Hey, Fowler is my middle name! Not kidding: Richard Fowler Mansfield. If they change the word, how will I be able to tell people that the Bible speaks of me?

 

Fowler was the only word on that list that I didn't recognize! 🤣 Now I know, and would vote to keep it in!

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25 minutes ago, docdave said:

Makes sense to make it freely available, but I was thinking ESV is copyrighted by the publisher?

 

Yes, the ESV is copyrighted by Crossway.

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I thought the New English Translation (NOT the LXX) was meant to be used on the internet ... but I have been known to be wrong ...

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5 minutes ago, Timothy Hall said:

I thought the New English Translation (NOT the LXX) was meant to be used on the internet ... but I have been known to be wrong ...

 

That was kind of the original intention to make a translation freely available with a very loose permission policy. It was the first translation to be released first on the Internet before print copies, I believe. 

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22 hours ago, R. Mansfield said:

 

Yes, the ESV is copyrighted by Crossway.

Yes indeed. I should be clearer. Crossway allowed people to access it for free from their server. That's what made it attractive for so many apps.

ESV API

Crossway allows you to access the ESV Bible text from our server and include it on your website or app, free of charge for non-commercial use. To learn more or register for the API, visit api.esv.org.

https://www.crossway.org/permissions/

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