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#165 Hebrew Text Criticism: A Case Study


Timothy Jenney
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The latest podcast is pretty technical—and requires at least a basic knowledge of Hebrew. It's a study of the textual variants in Deut 32:34-35, an ages-old debate between Samaritans and Jews. Does the text prophecy a coming Day of Judgement? Or is it a more general promise that "God will avenge" his people? Join Dr. J as he surveys the various texts that support each reading: the Massoretic Text, the Samaritan Pentateuch, the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Syriac Peshitta, the Septuagint, the Greek New Testament, the Old Latin Versions, and the Latin Vulgate.

 

Link: https://vimeo.com/272203775

 

post-29215-0-39110800-1527687884_thumb.jpeg 

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Great video showing how to use these tools.

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Thanks Dr. J. Even though I don't know Hebrew, I could follow the lesson and understand the controversies. I now know that I can use my Accordance library to search through these difficult passages.

 

Soli Deo Gloria,

Randy

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Thanks, Randy!

 

I was hoping interested people who didn't know Hebrew could follow the argument. I appreciate the confirmation.

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Although I never studied Hebrew, my brother-in-law, Dr. Douglas J. Culver, was professor of Hebrew at Erskine Theological Seminary until his death in 2007. I'm sure Doug would have approved of your work.

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I also find it useful to see other Accordance resources, like bhs, that I don’t own, not only in use, but also so I can make an informed descision about getting them and if I did, what other ones I would need as well as how I could use them.

 

Please keep setting us aflame!

 

;o)

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Thanks, Fraser!

 

I admit I'm spoiled. Since I produce these podcasts, I have access to all of Accordance's resources. Now, there are a lot of secondary resources (commentaries and such) I could do without, but having all these original languages texts is sheer joy. I've taken Hebrew, Greek and a bit of Aramaic and Akkadian, but neither Syriac or Latin. I'm amazed at just how much I can get out of tagged texts when I don't know the language—and how much I miss the tagging when it is absent (e.g. Vetus Latina). Even then, Accordance helped me by finding similar words in the Latin Vulgate, which is tagged, and amplifying them to Smith and Short's Latin lexicon.

 

I think I had more fun producing this podcast than any other project I've completed in my ten years at Accordance.

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This podcast still is not appearing on the iTunes feed for some reason.

 

:(

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This podcast still is not appearing on the iTunes feed for some reason.

 

:(

I first saw it (and the previous study bible one) with a link at the bottom of the weekly email.

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This podcast still is not appearing on the iTunes feed for some reason.

 

:(

 

I’ll look into it. 

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I made a mistake in the settings when I posted it. It might take a few minutes, but it should appear tonight in iTunes. Thanks for letting us know!

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  • 8 months later...

I appreciate your videos over the years for they have helped me to navigate Accordance with ease.  I am pursuing my Ph.D. in Old Testament and I recently bought the Greek Codex add on, but was truly disappointed that there is no OT text in them.  Does Accordance plan to add these?  It is pretty essential for textual criticism to have these manuscripts and texts to evaluate different readings.  

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In case it's of use to you there is a user bible of the Sinaiticus containing both OT and NT on the exchange : http://www.accordancefiles1.com/exchange/downloads/CodexSinaiticus.zip. Of course it has the limitations of a UB (no morph tagging etc) but the text is there.

 

But otherwise I agree, this material would be great to have.

 

Thx

D

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I don't know of any online source of either the VAT or Alex, but it's been a while since I checked. Well, strictly that's not true - there is https://digi.vatlib.it/view/MSS_Vat.gr.1209but it's got no transcription that I know of. Alex is at http://www.csntm.org/Manuscript/View/GA_02 and I haven't checked much for a transcription. The Sinaiticus is online at the British Library (http://codexsinaiticus.org/en/project/transcription.aspx) and is fully open. It's in a slightly modified TEI format.

 

Thx

D

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I don't know of any online source of either the VAT or Alex, but it's been a while since I checked. Well, strictly that's not true - there is https://digi.vatlib.it/view/MSS_Vat.gr.1209but it's got no transcription that I know of. Alex is at http://www.csntm.org/Manuscript/View/GA_02 and I haven't checked much for a transcription. The Sinaiticus is online at the British Library (http://codexsinaiticus.org/en/project/transcription.aspx) and is fully open. It's in a slightly modified TEI format.

 

Thx

D

You can also find the Allepo Codex which is fully viewable online. Just google it and it should come right up. Also the Leon Levy database of the Dead Sea Scrolls will be of use

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Thanks!

 

Considering writing it up for submission to a peer-reviewed journal, but haven't yet found the time.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Whoah. That was super cool.

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Thanks!

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