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brackets and CNTTS


Kristin
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I have a question about brackets and the CNTTS so-called "base text." In Lk 1:15 the definite article is in brackets, and I have always had confusion whether brackets mean "probably there" or "probably not there."

 

So I opened the CNTTS, and it shows me all the MSS which agree with the base reading, but what is the base reading?  ἐνώπιον τοῦ κυρίου, or ἐνώπιον κυρίου?

 

Thank you for any clarity anyone can provide concerning brackets and what the 0 in the CNTTS refers to.

Kristin

Bildschirmfoto 2021-07-23 um 13.36.51.png

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Hi Kristen,

 

Bear in mind I am not a text critic nor do I play one on TV. So hopefully someone with more knowledge can leap in with corrections if anything below is off.

 

I think you want the NA 28 Apparatus (and use the NA 28 Greek NT (sigla) text if you have it) intro to clarify this point.

 

Square brackets in the text ([ ]) except in the case of the Catholic Letters indicate that textual critics today are not completely convinced of the authenticity of the enclosed words (cf. Mt 18,19; Ac 16,1). These passages are always noted explicitly in the apparatus so that the reader may evaluate them independently. The reading given in the text shows the preference of the editors. For practical reasons the evidence given in the apparatus always includes the support for the reading in the text. Square brackets always reflect a great degree of difficulty in determining the text.

Holger Strutwolf, eds. Novum Testamentum Graece. 28th, Accordance electronic ed. (Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft, 2012), 54*.
https://accordance.bible/link/read/NA28_Apparatus#807

 

I agree they could have been clearer and simply said "the words in the [] are part of the base reading" but I think that "The reading given in the text shows the preference of the editors" is to be taken indicate that all the text in the NA28 is the reading they prefer. Then the brackets or other markup indicate various concerns or variants.

 

• 15 ⸂ κυριου ℵ A C L✱ ƒ1 33. 579. 1241. 2542. ℓ 844. ℓ 2211 pm; Cyr ¦ του θεου Θ Ψ ƒ13 700. 1424 ¦ txt B D K Lc W Γ Δ 565. 892 pm; Irlat |
    ⸄ εν κοιλια W it sy

Holger Strutwolf, eds. Novum Testamentum Graece. 28th, Accordance electronic ed. (Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft, 2012), paragraph 10171.
https://accordance.bible/link/read/NA28_Apparatus#10171

 

The witnesses after txt are the ones supporting the reading in the text. If you check out the Vaticanus for example (B https://manuscripts.csntm.org/manuscript/Group/GA_03?OSIS=Gal.3.1) you'll see τοῦ is present though κυρίου is a nomen sacrum in this witness, as CNTTS notes.

 

Regarding 0 in the CNTTS just mouse over and you'll see it refers to the base text UBS3. I don't have a UBS 3 - I don't know if Accordance has that text - they have 4 and 5. This first entry just lists the witnesses to this passage, whether whole or partial.

 

Thx

D

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Hi Λύχνις Δαν,
Thank you very much for your response. I understand my question was kind of technical, and I really appreciate your clear answer. I don't use the UBS3 either, and it actually never even occurred to me that the "base text" might not be the base I am looking at when reading the NA28. Given what you said, as much as I like the CNTTS, I should really compare the CNTTS base with the NA 28 Apparatus if it is something critical.

On a side note, I don't think Accordance carries the UBS3 either. I just checked and I can find the UBS5, but that likely differs from the CNTTS also.

 

In any case, thank you again,

Kristin

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If I'm not mistaken, the UBS3 text should be the same as the NA27, as well as the NA28 (except for the catholic epistles in the latter). You're right, Kristin: the apparatus of the NA28 is a better place to begin. It's not as complete as the CNTTS because it focuses on the more substantive variants. With the CNTTS, you have to wade through a lot of variants that are merely orthographic or obvious minor errors in transcription. That being said, if you want to be exhaustive, there are sometimes variants that could affect the meaning of the text in minor ways that are not mentioned in the NA28 app. So the CNTTS app. can be helpful after an initial look at N-A. The two really do supplement each other.

 

It's also good to be familiar with the CNTTS numbering system so as to recognize at a glance what may and may not affect the meaning.

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Hi @Donald Cobb,

Thank you for your thoughts, and you are correct about the importance of being familiar with the CNTTS numbering system. Really the one thing I fault the CNTTS for is  how cryptic they are. It is packed with information, but you really need to understand the CNTTS in order to even understand what it is saying. I finally started using highlights on it to make things clearer. :)

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cryptic indeed!

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Some time ago, a couple of us had a very interesting discussion with Joel Brown on how to better use the critical apparati. I found it very helpful, especially toward the end.

 

 

 

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59 minutes ago, Donald Cobb said:

Some time ago, a couple of us had a very interesting discussion with Joel Brown on how to better use the critical apparati. I found it very helpful, especially toward the end.

 

Thank you, Donald! I will take a look at this. :)

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