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How to search for attributive Participles


Marco V. Fabbri
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We have already searched for arthrous Participles that are Subject or Complement. It's time to turn to those that are Adjunct. Adjunct arthrous Participles are normally Adjunct to a non-verbal Phrase, and as such are widely known as attributive Participles.

 

In the GNT-T module, even without the syntax add-on, it was already possible to search for articular Participles. In the Search Text window. A good start could be the following search:

 

[Art] <FOLLOWED BY> <WITHIN 2 Words> [Verb participle ]

 

The results would look like this:

 

post-76-053828400 1321012670_thumb.png

 

If we examine the results, we notive some false hits. In Matthew 2:13, the Article doesn’t specify the Participle, as it is in a different case. Such false hits may be avoided, by adding one and the same case to both the Article and the Participle. The search in the Search Text window would then become:

 

[Art genit] <FOLLOWED BY> <WITHIN 2 Words> [Verb participle genit]

 

or

 

[Art dative] <FOLLOWED BY> <WITHIN 2 Words> [Verb participle dative]

 

and so on.

 

If we wanted to search at the same time for every possible case, we could turn to the Greek Construct Window, and have the Article and the Participle AGREE in Gender, Number and Case.

 

The search would look like this:

 

post-76-039814800 1321013148_thumb.png

 

Let's examine the results. Matthew 1:16 looks all right, but Matthew 1:19-20 doesn't. There two wrong results, because the search cannot know that the Article and the Participle don't belong to the same Phrase. In order to make sure of it, we will need the syntax add-on.

 

Also Matthew 1:20 is not right, because τὸ … γεννηθέν is a Subject substantival Participle. It was found nevertheless, because without the syntax we cannot distinguish between substantival Participles and attributive Participles. Both of them are arthrous Participles, so the presence of the Article cannot be enough to distinguish between them.

 

So we need to use the syntax add-on. Let's recall first that, according to the Greek syntax module, an attributive Participle is an articular Participle that is Adjunct to a non-verbal Phrase.

 

Also, the Participle will have an understood Subject, that will be the same as the word that the Participle is attribute to. An example will be needed: in the Phrase ὁ τεχθεὶς βασιλεύς, the Verb τεχθεὶς has an implied Subject. Who has been born? The answer is βασιλεύς.

In the syntax, the implied Subject of such Participles is a Null Subject, that has an Antecedent. The Antecedent is βασιλεύς. In the syntax tree, the implied Subject is marked as 01, and the correlative number 1 goes with its Antecedent βασιλεύς.

Both 01 and 1 can be found in a search for Antecedents.

 

With this in mind, we will build the search as follows:

 


  1.  
  2. Open a new Search Text, choose GNT-T as search text, and choose to search for Words (not Verses) within every Chapter or Book (not Verse, etc)
  3. Open a new Greek Construct (Command-2), that will be automatically linked to the Search Text
  4. In the Greek Construct window, drag the Clause element and drop it into the first column
  5. When prompted, choose Dependent and Adjunct, then click OK or press Return
  6. Drag the element Antecedent and drop it into the first column of the Adjun. DEPENDENT Clause
  7. Drag the element SUBJECT and drop it into the first column of the same Clause, below the element ANTECEDENT
  8. Drag the Verb element and drop it into the second column of the Adjun. DEPENDENT Clause
  9. When prompted, choose Mood: participle. If you want to find a specific Case, select it. Otherwise, participle will be enough. Then click OK or press Return
  10. We need to leave the box “Search both directions” unchecked, as the Subject must come before the participle.
  11. Press Return, or click on the search button.

 

The results will look like this:

 

post-76-034144300 1321016348_thumb.png

 

This finds the attributive participles.

 

The search may be narrowed down by clicking on the element VERB participle and adding gender, number and case.

 

 

[As a provisional note, Matthew 1:23 show among the results, because μεθερμηνευόμενον has an antecedent, even if it shouldn't. It will be removed in the next update to the syntax]

Edited by Marco V. Fabbri
added provisional note
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The search above is limited to the attributive Participle itself.

 

We may want to build a search that includes the Article that agrees with the Participle.

 

The steps would then be:

 

 

[*]Open a new Search Text, choose GNT-T as search text, and choose to search for Words (not Verses) within every Chapter or Book (not Verse, etc)

[*]Open a new Greek Construct (Command-2), that will be automatically linked to the Search Text

[*]In the Greek Construct window, drag the Phrase element and drop it into the first column

[*]When prompted, choose Adjunct, then click OK or press Return

[*]Drag the Article element and drop it into the first column of the ADJUNCT PHRASE

[*]When prompted, choose the desired Gender, Case or Number

[*]Drag the Clause element and drop it into the second column of the ADJUNCT PHRASE

[*]When prompted, choose Dependent and Adjunct, then click OK or press Return

[*]Drag the element Antecedent and drop it into the first column of the Adjun. DEPENDENT Clause

[*]Drag the element SUBJECT and drop it into the first column of the same Clause, below the element ANTECEDENT

[*]Drag the Verb element and drop it into the second column of the Adjun. DEPENDENT Clause

[*]When prompted, choose Mood: participle. Choose the desired Gender, Case or Number. We will take care to make the same choice that we made for the Article. Then click OK or press Return

[*]We need to leave the box

post-76-051212700 1321021606_thumb.png

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  • 6 years later...

I'm trying to do this search now with a little modification so that I don't use depth and I can't seem to get any hits. Can we get a more updated approach with all the changes that have happened here.

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