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Syntax search perplexity


Rod Decker
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Here's a search that I'd like to think could be done with the Syntax module, but I'm not sure how to go about it. Any suggestions?

 

1. Direct discourse formula (e.g., λέγει αὐτοῖς)

 

2. Followed by direct discourse

 

3. Followed by an adverbial participle phrase (which would be nominative)

 

 

An example of the construction for which I'm trying to find parallels is Mark 7:18-19.

 

1. καὶ λέγει αὐτοῖς

Edited by Rod Decker
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Sorry, Rod. You caught me, at least, in the middle of a week of meetings and grading.

 

I'm working with Dr. J. on it and we'll try to get you an answer soon.

 

(The good news is that the accuracy of the syntax searching in 9.2.1. is greatly improved, although not quite perfect yet. That means that in April I'll be working up the searching manual, which I'll then give to the Greek folks to modify for the NT module.)

 

Robert

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Here's a search that I'd like to think could be done with the Syntax module, but I'm not sure how to go about it. Any suggestions?

 

1. Direct discourse formula (e.g., λέγει αὐτοῖς)

 

2. Followed by direct discourse

 

3. Followed by an adverbial participle phrase (which would be nominative)

 

 

An example of the construction for which I'm trying to find parallels is Mark 7:18-19.

 

1. καὶ λέγει αὐτοῖς

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Rod, can you share a bit more with me about what you are trying to find? I am trying to construct the simplest search possible, but need a bit more information.

 

For instance, are you interested in locating the narrator/editor's interpretations of Jesus' speeches?

 

Or are you trying to find nominative participles that function as adverbs?

 

Is it important whether such instances are considered "parenthetical"?

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Rod, can you share a bit more with me about what you are trying to find? I am trying to construct the simplest search possible, but need a bit more information.

 

For instance, are you interested in locating the narrator/editor's interpretations of Jesus' speeches?

 

Or are you trying to find nominative participles that function as adverbs?

 

Is it important whether such instances are considered "parenthetical"?

 

I'm looking for author's interpretative statements such as seen in Mark's comment inserted in the middle of Jesus' words in the Mark example. In this case it is a participial clause, so that's what I was intending to search for. It is a parenthetical statement, so if that can be used instead of the participle, that's OK, though such features are not marked as clearly in Greek texts as English translations.

 

Some of these might be debatable, but the Mark example is not since the participle is grammatically excluded from being part of Jesus statement (it's masc, not neut, so must be adverbial modifying λεγει--the 3s subj of which refers to Jesus, rather than ἐκπορεύεται (the assumed subject of which is πᾶν τὸ ἔξωθεν). There's also a resumptive ἔλεγεν δὲ ὅτι following the parenthetical statement.

 

Is that enough info or do you want more? :) Thanks.

 

Rod

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I'm looking for author's interpretative statements such as seen in Mark's comment inserted in the middle of Jesus' words in the Mark example. In this case it is a participial clause, so that's what I was intending to search for. It is a parenthetical statement, so if that can be used instead of the participle, that's OK, though such features are not marked as clearly in Greek texts as English translations.

 

Some of these might be debatable, but the Mark example is not since the participle is grammatically excluded from being part of Jesus statement (it's masc, not neut, so must be adverbial modifying λεγει--the 3s subj of which refers to Jesus, rather than ἐκπορεύεται (the assumed subject of which is πᾶν τὸ ἔξωθεν). There's also a resumptive ἔλεγεν δὲ ὅτι following the parenthetical statement.

 

Is that enough info or do you want more? :) Thanks.

 

Rod

 

 

This does help, Rod, thanks.

 

I'll be working on this week's podcast the rest of the day, but will return to this puzzle over the weekend. Thanks for the challenge!

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Looks like everyone got busy on other things--or this is a tougher problem than some...?

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So sorry, Rod. I am swamped testing betas

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If you must... But hopefully this doesn't get forgotten. I doubt that you're the only one in a position to answer...

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If you must... But hopefully this doesn't get forgotten. I doubt that you're the only one in a position to answer...

 

Apologies, Rod. It's the end of the term here and everything non-course related has been pushed to the margins. Anyway, the last time I tried to answer one of your Greek questions, I mucked it up. But I've not forgotten it either.

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