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SALE! New from Brill & Zondervan + MORE!


R. Mansfield
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The wait is over! Much anticipated titles from Brill and Zondervan are finally available for the Accordance Bible Software Library! Introductory discounts should NOT be missed!

 

🆕 The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek (3rd ed.)—$74.90
🆕 Beekes, The Etymological Dictionary of Greek (2 volumes)—$75.00
🆕 The Context of Scripture (now includes 4th volume supplement)—$209
🆕 Grudem's Systematic Theology (2nd ed.)—$35.90
🆕 Grace & Truth Study notes$14.90
👉🏽 WJK Old/New Testament Library Everything Bundle (68 volumes)—$649
👉🏽 WJK OT/NT Library Commentary only (46 volumes)—$449
👉🏽 WJK OT Library Commentary (31 volumes)—$349
👉🏽 WJK NT Library Commentary (15 volumes)—$199
👉🏽 WJK OT Library Commentary: Classic volumes (9 volumes)—$149
👉🏽 WJK OT Library Companion Bundle (9 volumes)—$149
👉🏽 WJK NT Library Companion Bundle (4 volumes)—$49.90
👉🏽 Apollos Old Testament Commentary (10 volumes)—$175
👉🏽 Life Application Commentary: New Testament (17 volumes)—$99.90
👉🏽 JPS Commentary Set (12 volumes)—$239
👉🏽 The Commentators' Bible (5 volumes)—$159
👉🏽 Keil & Delitzsch, Commentary on the Old Testament (10 volumes)—$19.90

 

For more information, please see this week's sale blog post.

 

Sale Prices Valid through 11:59 PM (EDT) Monday, September 27, 2021

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On 9/20/2021 at 5:42 PM, R. Mansfield said:

Don't miss Brian Davidson's review of The Etymological Dictionary of Greek, newly released for the Accordance Bible Software Library.

Then add it to your personal Accordance Library for only $75 for a limited time!

 

This was helpful, but what I’d like to know is how easy is it to search for derivatives, since there are obviously many more derivatives than root words. If I search for εἰσέρχομαι, will I find a derivative?

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You will not get a result for εἰσέρχομαιYou would need to remember to take the prepositional prefix off first.

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But accordance can remind you with their root tagging.

1105775873_ScreenShot2021-09-21at4_50_06PM.thumb.png.a1b0c262c56068eea377977166c7a53d.pngBu

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5 hours ago, jlm said:

This was helpful, but what I’d like to know is how easy is it to search for derivatives, since there are obviously many more derivatives than root words. If I search for εἰσέρχομαι, will I find a derivative?

 

This is the entry for ερχομαι

 

ἔρχομαι [v.] ‘to come’, also ‘to go, travel’ (Il.). ◅IE *h1ergh-, *h1er- ‘move, go’▻
•var Only present stem.
•comp Very often with prefix ἀπ-, εἰσ-, ἐξ-, κατ-, etc.
•etym One has compared OIr. eirg [ipv.] ‘go!’, regaid [fut.] ‘he will go’, and Skt. r̥ghāyáti ‘tremble, rage’, and within Greek as an iterative ▸ ὀρχέομαι ‘dance’.
Alternatively, one has connected it with Skt. r̥ccháti ‘to reach, arrive at’, Hitt. arške/a-zi [iter.] ‘to reach repeatedly, make incursions’. This presupposes that ἔρχομαι continues PIE *h1r-sk-e/o-, which seems quite possible; thus Rix MSS 27 (1970): 79–110. Unrelated to ὀρ- in ▸ ὄρνυμι, which requires *h3er-.
•ref MSS

 

So the comp prefixes are available in some cases. The ID for comp indicates that only the most common or etymologically relevant are shown. I don't know precisely how one should interpret that though because I am unclear when the compound originated. Was it in IE or was it developed afterward either in Greek or ProtoGreek or somewhere/when else. As there is also an entry for εἰς it is unclear to me what the compound here indicates.

 

That said it might be a useful enhancement to the indexing of the module to be able to search ENTRY plus the COMP fields and thus be able to find compounds by the pieces where they exist. Also the variants I guess. Well I'm apparently behind the curve because this works. The indexes would be nice but you can do this until then :

 

sc.thumb.jpg.5087b5cae0ff1325748f4bf8beb75bf5.jpg

 

Thx

D

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Eis means into. 

erxomai means go. 
So the compound form eiserxomai developed as a way to say “go into”.

 

The etymology would be the same for eiserxomai (go into) or exerxomai (go out) so they only list one entry for the root form erxomai. 
 

The assumption would be that compounds are developed at some point within the language for pragmatic purposes and would be outside the realm of an etymological dictionary.
 

Apologies for the formatting here, and sorry if I am misunderstanding the question. Typing while sitting up with a sick child. 

Edited by Brian W. Davidson
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I hope the child feels better soon.

 

Regarding the question. The question wasn't really why or how so much as when. Did the compound develop in IE and come into the daughter languages as a single word ? Did it develop later in some pre-Greek (not necessarrily Beekes' PG) or did it develop within the record history of Greek. I agree it would appear that the dictionary appears to treat the formation as out of scope. But I don't know why PIE  or other languages would not have compounds but I don't know when that process arose in language.

 

Thx

D

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LAST CHANCE for introductory savings on new Greek lexicons from Brill, Context of Scripture vol. 4,  Grudem's Systematic 2nd ed. + deep discounts on other essential reference works. The Accordance EXCITING & NEW Sale ends at midnight EDT tonight!

 

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