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How do I search for a specific Niqqud pattern in tagged Hebrew?


shlomish3
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Hi, I am new to Accordance and trying to find all words according to a specific Niqqud pattern in Hebrew bible (Biblia Hebraica).

for instance, finding all words containing a Patach followed by a Maqqef at the end within the same word.

Two of my tries are attached in the photo below:

 

image.png.280ae416ed84d7ea0764d8238fc293dc.png

 

But they won't return the words I'm looking for.

 

P.S:

What's the difference between searching with " " and searching with a =?

 

Thank you

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On 7/25/2021 at 11:18 AM, shlomish3 said:

What's the difference between searching with " " and searching with a =?

 

 

While I can't help with the accent search, here is the information you can find about your question:

 

Searches Using Symbols

 

../../../Skins/Default/Stylesheets/Images/transparent.gifOther Symbols

The other symbols help to define a search for words or verse references.

Other Search Symbols How Used Notes
@ At sign is used to link together search criteria so that they apply to the same word. Examples include words and Key numbers, tag information with lexical, inflected forms or roots, or some commands. The symbol is entered automatically when grammatical tags are defined immediately after a word.  
' " Quotation marks are used to enclose inflected forms.  
=

When searching a Text, the equal sign in front of a word requires a search for the exact form which follows it. In non-tagged Texts the exact search includes all word punctuation such as hyphens and apostrophes, capital letters, accents, and other diacritical marks. Thus a search for =mark finds mark but not Mark, and =sons finds sons but not son's. If the equal sign is not used, then punctuation, case, and accents are ignored in the search. The equal sign can be automatically entered in front of each word selected from the Select Words dialog box.

In Greek the exact search includes the capitalization, ending forms, accents, and breathing marks. In Hebrew it includes the vowels, ending forms, and homograph numbers.

When searching a Tool, the equal sign in front of a verse reference searches for the exact reference rather than any reference which includes it.

Very old versions of Accordance modules../../../Skins/Default/Stylesheets/Images/transparent.gif do not fully support exact searches.
+ The plus sign requires a search for the root../../../Skins/Default/Stylesheets/Images/transparent.gif form in tagged Texts, so that it finds all words derived from that root  
.

A period followed by any single character except a blank space, searches for that character. This can be used for alphanumeric characters, punctuation, accents and cantillation marks. The search is case sensitive, and can only be used when searching the Verse field (not within a sentence, chapter, etc.).

The character can be part of a phrase, an @ expression, or a connecting expression.

Parentheses and commas are used as usual to indicate alternative characters (with the period directly in front of each character to be searched).

For details, see More about the Period (.) Symbol, below
( ) Parentheses are used to specify logical groupings of expressions. The expressions inside the parentheses are evaluated first and then combined with the other expressions in the argument  
- Hyphen indicates a range or a negative (option hyphen can also be used for a range)  
, Comma separates items on a list, such as alternate words inside parentheses, or chapters or verses  
: Colon separates chapter and verse (a period is also allowed)  
; Semicolon divides groups of references  
ff Extends the reference to the end of the last defined unit (last verse, chapter, or book) (for example, Gen 20ff would display Genesis, chapter 20 to the end of Genesis)  
f f adds one of the last unit (Gen for example, Gen 20f would display Genesis, chapters 20 and 21)  
 
 
For Hebrew accent search, here is the relevant part (I hope a few examples are offered here):
 
 
../../../Skins/Default/Stylesheets/Images/transparent.gifMore About the Period (.) Symbol

In Hebrew this capability allows searching for cantillation marks either individually or together with a word or tag form. 

In both Greek and Hebrew the search ignores differences in the amount of overstrike, and combination with other diacriticals. Therefore, similar diacritical marks are found in one search. For example, a search for an acute accent will not only find all the different overstrike acute accents, but also all combinations of a breathing mark with an acute accent.

../../resources/images/icon_a_hint.png

Hint

Add spaces before the period in order to view backstrike characters such as accents.

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Try these two:

 .־@"=*ַ*"  https://accordance.bible/link/search/HMT-W4?.־@"=*ַ*"

and

.־@"=*ַ"    https://accordance.bible/link/search/HMT-W4?.־@"=*ַ"

 

Here is a screenshot if the RTL is messing things up. The first search uses two asterisks for when the patach is not next to the maqqef. The second uses a single asterisk for when the patach is next to the maqqef. The search says: "Look for the literal character maqqef that is attached to a word that has a patach." The maqqef (and cantillation marks) are treated differently than vowels in Accordance. You can search for literal characters using a period followed by the character. The quotes with an equal sign inside ("חֹ֖שֶׁךְ=") searches for the exact form of a word, meaning that it takes into consideration the vowel pointings. That's how we can capture the patach. 

 

Hope that is what you are looking for!

 

200076600_ScreenShot2021-07-29at9_45_32AM.thumb.png.afb38d92c545324652524efe9bcfe2f4.png

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2 hours ago, martinacc said:

 

While I can't help with the accent search, here is the information you can find about your question:

 

Searches Using Symbols

 

../../../Skins/Default/Stylesheets/Images/transparent.gifOther Symbols

The other symbols help to define a search for words or verse references.

Other Search Symbols How Used Notes
@ At sign is used to link together search criteria so that they apply to the same word. Examples include words and Key numbers, tag information with lexical, inflected forms or roots, or some commands. The symbol is entered automatically when grammatical tags are defined immediately after a word.  
' " Quotation marks are used to enclose inflected forms.  
=

When searching a Text, the equal sign in front of a word requires a search for the exact form which follows it. In non-tagged Texts the exact search includes all word punctuation such as hyphens and apostrophes, capital letters, accents, and other diacritical marks. Thus a search for =mark finds mark but not Mark, and =sons finds sons but not son's. If the equal sign is not used, then punctuation, case, and accents are ignored in the search. The equal sign can be automatically entered in front of each word selected from the Select Words dialog box.

In Greek the exact search includes the capitalization, ending forms, accents, and breathing marks. In Hebrew it includes the vowels, ending forms, and homograph numbers.

When searching a Tool, the equal sign in front of a verse reference searches for the exact reference rather than any reference which includes it.

Very old versions of Accordance modules../../../Skins/Default/Stylesheets/Images/transparent.gif do not fully support exact searches.
+ The plus sign requires a search for the root../../../Skins/Default/Stylesheets/Images/transparent.gif form in tagged Texts, so that it finds all words derived from that root  
.

A period followed by any single character except a blank space, searches for that character. This can be used for alphanumeric characters, punctuation, accents and cantillation marks. The search is case sensitive, and can only be used when searching the Verse field (not within a sentence, chapter, etc.).

The character can be part of a phrase, an @ expression, or a connecting expression.

Parentheses and commas are used as usual to indicate alternative characters (with the period directly in front of each character to be searched).

For details, see More about the Period (.) Symbol, below
( ) Parentheses are used to specify logical groupings of expressions. The expressions inside the parentheses are evaluated first and then combined with the other expressions in the argument  
- Hyphen indicates a range or a negative (option hyphen can also be used for a range)  
, Comma separates items on a list, such as alternate words inside parentheses, or chapters or verses  
: Colon separates chapter and verse (a period is also allowed)  
; Semicolon divides groups of references  
ff Extends the reference to the end of the last defined unit (last verse, chapter, or book) (for example, Gen 20ff would display Genesis, chapter 20 to the end of Genesis)  
f f adds one of the last unit (Gen for example, Gen 20f would display Genesis, chapters 20 and 21)  
 
 
For Hebrew accent search, here is the relevant part (I hope a few examples are offered here):
 
 
../../../Skins/Default/Stylesheets/Images/transparent.gifMore About the Period (.) Symbol

In Hebrew this capability allows searching for cantillation marks either individually or together with a word or tag form. 

In both Greek and Hebrew the search ignores differences in the amount of overstrike, and combination with other diacriticals. Therefore, similar diacritical marks are found in one search. For example, a search for an acute accent will not only find all the different overstrike acute accents, but also all combinations of a breathing mark with an acute accent.

../../resources/images/icon_a_hint.png

Hint

Add spaces before the period in order to view backstrike characters such as accents.

 

Thank you! I searched for this kind of documentation for too long, this really helps!

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1 hour ago, Jordan S said:

Try these two:

 .־@"=*ַ*"  https://accordance.bible/link/search/HMT-W4?.־@"=*ַ*"

and

.־@"=*ַ"    https://accordance.bible/link/search/HMT-W4?.־@"=*ַ"

 

Here is a screenshot if the RTL is messing things up. The first search uses two asterisks for when the patach is not next to the maqqef. The second uses a single asterisk for when the patach is next to the maqqef. The search says: "Look for the literal character maqqef that is attached to a word that has a patach." The maqqef (and cantillation marks) are treated differently than vowels in Accordance. You can search for literal characters using a period followed by the character. The quotes with an equal sign inside ("חֹ֖שֶׁךְ=") searches for the exact form of a word, meaning that it takes into consideration the vowel pointings. That's how we can capture the patach. 

 

Hope that is what you are looking for!

 

200076600_ScreenShot2021-07-29at9_45_32AM.thumb.png.afb38d92c545324652524efe9bcfe2f4.png

 

Thank you! That's exactly what I was looking for!

the dot search and @ really helps.

thanks again

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