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Italian Interlinear NT and Greek-Italian Lexicon


Fabian
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Hello

 

I would love to see the Italian interlinear and the Italian-Greek lexikon from http://www.laparola.net I was in contact with him years ago. He had also a link to Accordance one time. I tried that Tim goes in contact with him. But I guess he had never done it. AFAIK he's an American, maybe with Italian ancestors. So don't fear the Italian UI of the website. The App comes with both languages.

 

Maybe he has more which is interesting for the Accordance USERS.

 

Thanks.

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  • 2 months later...

I used the program a bit in the past. More content for Italian speakers would be good. Tagging the 2008 CEI translation with Strong's or G/K numbers would be a great step forward, in that it would enable cross-highlighting, the dynamic interlinear, and the [TEXT] command. However, I know it would be a lot of work, so I haven't bothered to ask. Then a Greek-Italian lexicon would be useful, either directly as a Dictionary, or as a resource for providing Italian glosses for Greek texts.

 

This particular lexicon would be useful in the absence of something else, but it looks more like something compiled personally by the author of the program, Richard Wilson, than a scholarly resource.

 

Mr. Wilson says he's a born and bred Australian, who moved to Italy in 1992. He wanted to evangelize students at the University of Trent—probably not an easy task, since that's where the Red Brigades got their start.

 

As for alternative resources, there's:

 

  • Carlo Rusconi. Vocabolario del greco del Nuovo Testamento. 3rd ed. Bologna: EDB, 2013—See publisher's website. It's required for the Greek course in Italian at the Pontifical Biblical Institute.
  • Giuliano Vigini. Vocabolario del NT greco-italiano. Milano: Paoline, 2003.
  • Franco Montanari. Vocabolario della lingua greca. 3rd ed. Torino: Loescher, 2013. This is for Ancient Greek in general, and was translated as the BrillDAG. Since there's an app ("GI Montanari"), the dictionary definitely exists in electronic form.

 

There are also more substantial resources translated from German, like Gerhard Kittel. Grande lessico del Nuovo Testamento. Brescia: Paideia, 1965-1992. It's still in print, but is probably too old to have an electronic text.

 

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