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Basics of Hebrew Accents


MattChristianOT
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If possible I would also like to have this work in Accordance too....

 

however, as the author is connected with another software company (the other software company already has a prepublication page up for the said volume) and seems to be preparing to release this book digital for the other later this year I am not sure how feasible or probably it would be for Accordance to acquire the license need to produce and sell it. But maybe it is possible? After all Accordance does have the author's Begining Hebrew Text (LINK).

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If possible I would also like to have this work in Accordance too....

 

however, as the author is connected with another software company (the other software company already has a prepublication page up for the said volume) and seems to be preparing to release this book digital for the other later this year I am not sure how feasible or probably it would be for Accordance to acquire the license need to produce and sell it. But maybe it is possible? After all Accordance does have the author's Begining Hebrew Text (LINK).

Shouldn't be too difficult since it is published by Zondervan

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The only caveat I'd offer is that we still don't * fully understand* the accents well. So any "textbook" is simply speculation. There are still theses occasionally written on the accents; I reviewed an essay a few months ago that proposed an entirely new analysis (it was very intriguing).

 

The current best resource for understanding all things Masoretic is Israel Yeivin's Introduction to the Tiberian Masorah (trans. and rev. by E. J. Revell; Scholars Press, 1980). If the new book under question isn't just terribly problematic, it is likely a summary of Yeivin (and why have a summary when you have the full thing, which is already quite understandable?).

 

Now if the Yeivin book were turned into an accordance module, it would be fantastic! 

Edited by Robert Holmstedt
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The only caveat I'd offer is that we still don't * fully understand* the accents well. So any "textbook" is simply speculation. There are still theses occasionally written on the accents; I reviewed an essay a few months ago that proposed an entirely new analysis (it was very intriguing).

 

The current best resource for understanding all things Masoretic is Israel Yeivin's Introduction to the Tiberian Masorah (trans. and rev. by E. J. Revell; Scholars Press, 1980). If the new book under question is just terribly problematic, it is likely a summary of Yeivin (and why have a summary when you have the full thing, which is already quite understandable?).

 

Now if the Yeivin book were turned into an accordance module, it would be fantastic! 

Agreed. Greg Khan recently launched a two volume work on the Tiberian vocalization that is open access through Cambridge University. He suggests some new vocalizations. I personally have not studied any of it and the different theories beyond the basics but I know some interest has been expressed here on the vocalization systems, hence my post

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Now if the Yeivin book were turned into an accordance module, it would be fantastic! 

 

 

Hi Robert and Matt,

 

I asked Accordance for this years ago at https://www.accordancebible.com/forums/topic/17263-introduction-to-the-tiberian-masorah/?p=83502

 

Please add your +1 to revive the thread, and let Accordance know you would like it too.

 

Thanks.

 

Michel

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Hi Robert and Matt,

 

I asked Accordance for this years ago at https://www.accordancebible.com/forums/topic/17263-introduction-to-the-tiberian-masorah/?p=83502

 

Please add your +1 to revive the thread, and let Accordance know you would like it too.

 

Thanks.

 

Michel

 

Done- Robert did as well. I think all of these would be useful and hopefully offer some contrasting views for study and comparison

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.The current best resource for understanding all things Masoretic is Israel Yeivin's Introduction to the Tiberian Masorah (trans. and rev. by E. J. Revell; Scholars Press, 1980). If the new book under question isn't just terribly problematic, it is likely a summary of Yeivin (and why have a summary when you have the full thing, which is already quite understandable?).

Wow, that is an intriguing and bold statement considering Yeivin's book was written 40 years ago although this may be true and Yeivin's book continues to be the scholarly standard.

 

I am curious how you feel about Joshua R. Jacobson's, Chanting the Hebrew: The Complete Guide to the Art of Cantillation. Being that Jacobson's encyclopedic text runs about 965 pages it is hard for me to believe that it could likely be simply a summary of Yeivin's book which only 324 pages. To be sure Jacobson does refer to both Yeivin's "Hat'amat ha-torah she-ba'al peh ba-te'amm" in Leshoneynu 24, and "Introduction the Tiberian Masorah".

 

 

 

Now if the Yeivin book were turned into an accordance module, it would be fantastic! 

I fully agree with the statement above! I too would love to see Yeivin's work (and works) in Accordance, too!

 

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Wow, that is an intriguing and bold statement considering Yeivin's book was written 40 years ago although this may be true and Yeivin's book continues to be the scholarly standard.

 

I am curious how you feel about Joshua R. Jacobson's, Chanting the Hebrew: The Complete Guide to the Art of Cantillation. Being that Jacobson's encyclopedic text runs about 965 pages it is hard for me to believe that it could likely be simply a summary of Yeivin's book which only 324 pages. To be sure Jacobson does refer to both Yeivin's "Hat'amat ha-torah she-ba'al peh ba-te'amm" in Leshoneynu 24, and "Introduction the Tiberian Masorah".

 

 

 

I fully agree with the statement above! I too would love to see Yeivin's work (and works) in Accordance, too!

 

Thanks for the input- I have a general interest in most of this so any and all resources would be neat, BUT I will always push for original language texts before any "book." Patristic, and Syriac texts would be nice

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Wow, that is an intriguing and bold statement considering Yeivin's book was written 40 years ago although this may be true and Yeivin's book continues to be the scholarly standard.

 

I am curious how you feel about Joshua R. Jacobson's, Chanting the Hebrew: The Complete Guide to the Art of Cantillation. Being that Jacobson's encyclopedic text runs about 965 pages it is hard for me to believe that it could likely be simply a summary of Yeivin's book which only 324 pages. To be sure Jacobson does refer to both Yeivin's "Hat'amat ha-torah she-ba'al peh ba-te'amm" in Leshoneynu 24, and "Introduction the Tiberian Masorah".

 

 

The reason Yeivin's work remains the best is that Masoretic studies is a very small field. There have been a couple theses on the underlying system of the accents, but none of the ideas have made their way into a broader work. 

 

I hae no feelings about the Jacobsen book because I've never looked at it. I will only say that learning how to chant the text in a modern context may have little relevance to understanding the early medieval Masoretic system, simply because we don't even know what the medieval musical tropes were. So, I wonder how much the two works would overlap (Yeivin doesn't discuss the musical aspect at all).

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The reason Yeivin's work remains the best is that Masoretic studies is a very small field. There have been a couple theses on the underlying system of the accents, but none of the ideas have made their way into a broader work.

Thank you for your reply that makes sense.

 

So, I wonder how much the two works would overlap (Yeivin doesn't discuss the musical aspect at all).

Me, too. I will have to pick up a copy of Yeivin's work sometime.

 

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