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Hey friends,

 

I'm hoping to get some assistance in researching a subject / point of debate.

 

The question is, "Is the 'teaching' we see in the OT and NT generally a method of teaching that is one-to-many for the purposes of relaying information about God and Scripture or is the 'teaching' we see described in Scripture more relational in nature?"

 

For example, when Paul uses the word "teach" in 1 Tim 4:11 is he primarily thinking of teaching within a gathered assembly (like a class or Sunday morning sermon) or he is thinking of teaching within the context of a one-on-one or small group relationship (I realize this is a bit of a fallacy of the excluded middle) like when you're having lunch with a friend and instruct him at that time?

 

I think it is clear that both of these types of "teaching" are found in Scripture and are important. But.. if you were going to research this question, how would you use Accordance to do so?

Edited by jarcher
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Hey ya,

 

  Hmmm.... I suppose if I were doing this I would look at:

 

  Research based queries on the journals and commentaries in case anyone has written on this. This may be aided by information gleaned from the point below - or not.

 

  Word studies of all words used in the NT/OT in a manner descriptive of teaching - both Hebrew and Greek - to see if there are any connotations of teaching in one manner or another. Verbs associated with preaching, teaching speaking, reading in the synagogue or like gatherings, for example.

 

  I do not know if there is anything in Accordance that treats the topic of ancient pedagogy, public preaching and giving of lectures but that would be worth a look also.

 

  Examination of all instances which can be described as teaching, of whatever kind, in the NT and OT. Actually, this is probably where one ought to start. In theory this is all you need if one only wants to determine what the dominant type is. I suppose there is more to it than that though - and no I'm not asking for details. Best done in the OL I suspect, but could be worked back from a translation, so as to provide input on the things above. Actually the more I think on this the more I think this is where I would start. The stuff above would either feed off this or would be shown to be unnecessary.

 

  Depending upon the classification scheme you want to use, 1-1 vs 1-many vs familiars-strangers, you may want to research schemes too but that probably isn't in Acc.

 

Thx

D

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  • 3 weeks later...

I would recommend reading some of this book: https://www.amazon.com/Mikra-Translation-Reading-Interpretation-Christianity/dp/0801047234/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=Mikra&qid=1585309058&sr=8-3

 

It is on reception history of the (mainly) OT but does have material on the use of Scripture over time and the idea of written versus read. Depending on how you are working through this material, a study of reception history may be insightful

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Sounds like a very cool topic to study.

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Bill Schniedewind recently put out a book on scribal learning in Israel. The research focuses on the Kunjillet 'Ajrud inscriptions and he attempts to trace how Israelite scribes were taught and learned. Might be helpful? Not 100% sure if it does. I find it fascinating but I am a bit biased as most of my research is on Epigraphic Hebrew. Just the idea of purposeful education, especially in the vein of scribal culture may be helpful.

 

https://www.amazon.com/Finger-Scribe-Scribes-Learned-Write/dp/0190052465/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=Finger+of+the+scribe&qid=1585522374&sr=8-1

 

I am also working on a book review of this:

 

Studies in Jewish Education: The Oral and the Textual in Jewish Tradition and Jewish Education

Edited by Jonathan CohenMatt GoldishBarry Holtz

 

(From the back of the book)

The articles in this volume originated, in large part, as papers presented at a conference convened by the Melton Coalition for Creative Interaction in December 2014 at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The Melton Coalition is a consortium of the three Melton Centers established over the years by the visionary philanthropist Samuel Mendel Melton: at the Jewish Theological Seminary, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Ohio State University. The conference was devoted to the various forms of interaction that obtain between the oral and the textual modes of discourse in Jewish history and contemporary Jewish life. Some of the essays dwell on oral and textual media in historical context – while others place more emphasis on the contemporary educational implications of the phenomena under discussion. All the essays in this volume articulate patterns of oral and written discourse that can greatly enrich our knowledge of both the history of Jewish culture and the theory and practice of Jewish education.

 

Not on Amazon but published by the Hebrew University (Magnes Press)

 

Which is somewhat in line with this topic but focused on Second Temple/ Rabbinic Work. I hope to see my review published in December but so far the book has been rather enjoyable!

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  • 8 months later...

Saw this book recently and remembered this post. You might benefit from this:

 

https://secure.aidcvt.com/sbl/ProdDetails.asp?ID=063548P&PG=1&Type=BL&PCS=SBL

 

Also my review of the above mentioned book Is published:

http://naphhebrew.org/hhe-23-2021

 

If you wanted some more information on it. Hope this benefits everyone pursuing this topic!

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Saw this book recently and remembered this post. You might benefit from this:

 

https://secure.aidcvt.com/sbl/ProdDetails.asp?ID=063548P&PG=1&Type=BL&PCS=SBL

 

Also my review of the above mentioned book Is published:

http://naphhebrew.org/hhe-23-2021

 

If you wanted some more information on it. Hope this benefits everyone pursuing this topic!

 

Thank you!

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  • 2 months later...

Found another resource that might be of use:

https://www.amazon.com/Ancient-Beihefte-Zeitschrift-Alttestamentliche-Wissensch/dp/3110335492/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=to+teach+in+ancient+israel&qid=1613091006&sr=8-2

 

It is a lexical semantic study rooted in Cognitive linguistics but might help to really frame what you are looking for (maybe). As I find new things I will keep the thread updated.

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