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"When 'Omer smote 'is bloomin' lyre"... commentary on Iliad by Benner


Leonardo
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Being as that you good folks have included the Perseus texts of Homer, Herodotus, and more, there is a commentary in the public domain for selections from the Iliad, by one Allen Rogers Benner.  Hopes for addition to the module.

 

 

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I agree- Not my field of study or interest, but Accordance should be capitalizing on what they do best, text editions and linked study resources to them. Forget chasing monographs, be the program scholars and lay people use to write monographs through detailed cross analysis

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Thanks for the reply. I realise that this is Bible oriented software, but it was pleasant to see the Perseue module.  I will get that when the larder has seen increase. It just seems like the

 

Perseus or classical Greek is a good fit for Accordance, See the confidence we have in you?

 

Clyde Pharr in his introduction to Homeric Greek, commented how Homer and Plato were the most important classical authors for the study of NT, in his view.

Being in business, I realise that one must go where the fish are if you want to catch fish.

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My own opinion on this is that "bible study software" as a term is simply a limited application of the larger software based text study. I wrote this up once, but basically what we do with Accordance (or Logos or Bibleworks or ......) is study texts, refer to relevant reference works, and write more materials of our own, notes, monographs, lists, vocab charts, study guides, what have you. I proposed at one point a Language Research Workbench that might be customized to studies in different domains and languages. Accordance is a fair way on in that in some senses but not in others, likewise Logos. But expanding beyond biblical and allied material, and even too much into allied materials which go too far afield isn't a money making proposition and difficult to justify. You might get interest from Shakespeare scholars for example, but how many people read and deeply study Shakespeare once they escape high school - yes I know there are some, but is it a market one can live off ?

 

So I believe greater breadth of texts under study is great. But I think that there will always be a business case for limiting the expansion. I know I've requested many Greek resources that go beyond the basics. I doubt they will come to Accordance for the reasons mentioned. That said, I think that biblical greek learning benefits greatly for studying Greek more broadly than NT and its immediate contemporaries.

 

Thx

D

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