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Anglicized NIV


bkrewson
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I would prefer Anglicised NRSV. But would be interested in the NIVa too if modestly priced. But neither are high on my priority list.

 

-dan

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What exactly is an Anglicised bible ? English spelling, English idiom ?

 

Thx

D

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Yes that is what it is one of the most notably of idiom changes it grain to corn. Where as we in NA tend to think of corn meeaning Maize whereas corn in UK Ireland = (1)

corn1

n

1. Brit

a. any of various cereal plants, esp the predominant crop of a region, such as wheat in England and oats in Scotland and Ireland

b. the seeds of such plants, esp after harvesting

c. a single seed of such plants; a grain

 

The changes overall in both feel minor but it can be nice seeing more familiar spellings and rendering in more colloquial terms.

 

-Dan

Edited by Daniel Francis
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English spelling

 

Thx

D

Some might even say “Correct spelling”!!!!!

(As there may be a clue in the name and I used to get flak from some at church for projecting non anglicized text.)

 

;o)

 

Separated by a common language

Edited by ukfraser
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It may be in the KJV but English has moved on since then so you no-longer get the word 'gotten'.

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I’d Love an anglicised (note the ‘s’) version too, as would most Aussies.

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So it isn't a full dialect translation. I was wondering about this and ran across http://www.really-learn-english.com/grammar-differences-between-american-and-british-english.html, http://www.onestopenglish.com/grammar/grammar-reference/american-english-vs-british-english/differences-in-american-and-british-english-grammar-article/152820.article.

 

I guess to really compare these you'd need a modern American (say ESV, NIV I guess) and modern English/British translation (?) and compare pericopes. Of course similar translation philosophy would be helpful to minimise other issues - but functional rather than literal would be best to avoid colouring the translation overly much with non-native or seemingly awkward constructions.

 

I suspect the languages haven't diverged enough for full independent translations to be considered worth doing, on that basis alone.

 

Thx
D

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Say to them, ‘This is what the Sovereign LORD says: A great eagle with powerful wings, long feathers and full plumage of varied colors came to Lebanon. Taking hold of the top of a cedar,

(Ezek 17:3 NIV11-GKE)

 

Anglisized has “colours”

 

Initially I used to correct it before projecting. Then decided life was too short.

 

Now I tend to let those who complain, complain. When I look round a service, only about 5% are following the reading in a bible or lectionary. The others are just listening.

 

When I prepare a service, the reading is projected so at least everyone can easily follow it if they desire, even if it hasn’t been anglisized. If it really matters so much to them, they can always open the bible or lectionary.

 

I have spent too long working for international companies where the spelling default is ms and with non anglisized software versions.

 

Yes it’s nice to have but...

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I suspect the languages haven't diverged enough for full independent translations to be considered worth doing, on that basis alone.

D

On a personal note I find the message is getting that way.

 

It is also very obvious when someone has lifted their sermon from the Internet.

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And on this side of the pond I will sometimes use The New English Bible or The Revised English Bible just to see reactions. :) 

 

I switched from the AV to NEB in mid summer of 1970 and used it almost exclusively for a few decades. I still enjoy seeing reactions to 1Sam 13:15a when read from the NEB or REB.

 

—Joseph

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Thank you - very interesting.

 

Thx

D

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Here's a list of the changes:

 

http://www.slowley.com/nivuk/

 

Well, I actually like quite a few of the NIVUK phrasings over the same in the NIV. Perhaps this is a result of spending so many hours with 'The History of English Podcast'—I am almost to 1066 AD. 

 

—Joseph

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You could chew up a ton o' hours on that podcast - never knew it existed - thanx for the tip.

 

thx

D

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