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Had the logos guys give me a demo


mythrenegade
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I found this interesting. I was at a conference and logos was a sponsor, and I figured it's always good to "look over the fence" a little bit at what the competition has, because my opinions of logos are all formed from when I was in seminary (11 years ago!) and my fellow students always were looking over my shoulder at accordance because they couldn't get the information out of logos. Not that it didn't have it, but they couldn't figure out how to get it.

 

The salesman was VERY dismissive of Accordance except for "original language research" which is fine, I expect that, but I told him I wanted to see the interface and see what had changed in the 11 years since I last played with it.

 

In short. it is WAY better than it used to be. No question. 

 

HOWEVER.

 

When I asked him to add a translation to a screen he was working in, it took him a long time, and then he made a comment "oh, i need to put a comma in this box here" and I thought "what member of my staff team is going to remember that?"

 

The product seemed SLOW. Lots of spinning wheels. When I asked about it, he said he hadn't restarted his computer in a long time. That may be so, but the performance was, to me, unacceptable. 

 

It seemed to bring up results in resources you don't own, encouraging you to buy them. I'm not sure if that's exactly what was happening, but I _REALLY_ didn't like this. 

 

Finally, the pricing was very, very expensive. I'll be honest, I have been one of the people who has been pretty critical of Accordance's pricing in the past, feeling that the "dump everything in" pricing of logos worked out cheaper, but when I looked at the resources included that I would like and the price points in play, it was significantly more than I have ever spent on accordance. For me I was looking at a $3000 package for what I consider essential. I could create the same thing in accordance for less than $1000.

 

And the starter edition of accordance is an amazing value. Logos starter is $300 and it goes up rapidly from there.

 

I know I sound like a shill at this point, but I'm really not. YES, I've used accordance since I first discovered it at MacWorld like 25 years ago, and yes I have purchased site licenses of accordance and trained my own staff on it, but I really was open to looking at another option if it was better. Based on my fifteen or so minutes with Logos, i can't imagine making the change. 

 

Accordance rocks.

 

Joel

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I like my Verbum.... but I love my Accordance. I have long felt it was a night and day comparison. I will admit there are a few nice features one can find in the Faithlife (FL) products, but mostly totally unneeded fluff. Accordance is fast to start up and fast to use. The other is so slow to start up as to make a tortoise hare comparison insulting to a tortoise. Both once running can work fairly good but in general Accordance usually wins hands down. FL has a huge library offering but in my opinion the best of what is out there is available already in Accordance, Accordance also offers several very high quality works that you will not find in FL. I will continue to use both but if I was told tomorrow I could only use one or the other, I would choose Accordance without doubt. 

 

-Dan

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I have bought quite a few resources in Logos simply because they weren't available (at the time) in Accordance but I much prefer using the Accordance software. 

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Accordance staff seem to have a clear "don't diss the others guys" policy which, from what I hear, does not appear to be reciprocated.

Edited by Alistair
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Alistair,

 

I was kind of disappointed by that as well. The approach by Accordance Staff is the right one. Treat your competitors with respect and let their success spurn you on to greatness. But this thread should stay positive, I shared it because I was encouraged by my "peek over the fence" and I felt others might be as well. 

 

FWIW I told him "Accordance still has you beat on interface and responsiveness" :-)

 

Joel

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There are things I still do in Logos and probably always will (because I know how in that platform and don't know how to or it's not available in Accordance). Also, I have some commentaries in Logos that will probably never be in Accordance (and that's fine with me). I'm glad Logos is available, and I'm glad I can make use of it.

 

However, the two main non-functional differences I see are the following. I'm not talking about what one program can do and the other can't or vice versa. These major non-functional differences are (1) the overall philosophy of the company [which I would describe as "earn a reasonable reward for your labor" {Accordance} vs. "maximize profits" {Logos}] and the (2) manner and corporate culture with which customers are served. Accordance's staff does very, very well. Thank you, Oak Tree / Accordance!

Edited by EricC
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There are things I still do in Logos and probably always will (because I know how in that platform and don't know how to or it's not available in Accordance). Also, I have some commentaries in Logos that will probably never be in Accordance (and that's fine with me). I'm glad Logos is available, and I'm glad I can make use of it.

 

You may want to post the research question and see if it is possible (or something like it). You never know if it is possible, or if it is a good idea might make it in a future update. 

 

Also, feel free to request the commentaries in this thread. We're pretty much at the point where all major commentaries are available, and we can work with almost every publisher out there. Some exceptions of course, and some niche resources might be more difficult to justify with our long list of resources in queue for acquisition and/or development.

 

Thanks for the feedback!

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@Joel: You call yourself "Myth Renegade" but your avatar says "Marathon"—Wish I had spent as much time in Accordance as I did "studying" those two :)

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  • 2 weeks later...

Adding a bible or other book to a window in parallel or in a new tab is trivial and easy in Logos and works much like it does in Accordance. However, overall Accordance is MUCH faster than Logos to start up or open a new feature like opening the home page or the settings scene or documents list. Logos also takes a beefy computer to use it adequately while Accordance can run well on lower end systems.

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Thank you all for your enthusiasm and kind comments. You make our work worthwhile. And, yes, we have a company policy about not commenting on other Bible software programs. We try to put all our energy into making Accordance the best Bible software program we can.

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I have both products but prefer Accordance for most applications and most especially for the User Bible and User Note features. I do like the Word Study on Logos, but I dislike the speed of operation including the time to startup the application. Both are good, but I now rarely use Logos except for books not available with Accordance and some Word Studies.

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I have both products but prefer Accordance for most applications and most especially for the User Bible […] features. 

 

If I see what you can do with the User Bibles and User Tools in L see https://wiki.logos.com/Personal_Books then I wish a lot or better all of them in Accordance. 

 

Greetings

 

Fabian

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  • 1 year later...

You may want to post the research question and see if it is possible (or something like it). You never know if it is possible, or if it is a good idea might make it in a future update. 

 

Also, feel free to request the commentaries in this thread. We're pretty much at the point where all major commentaries are available, and we can work with almost every publisher out there. Some exceptions of course, and some niche resources might be more difficult to justify with our long list of resources in queue for acquisition and/or development.

 

Thanks for the feedback!

I'm invested in Accordance because over a decade ago it was the best that would run on my Mac.  But as a Catholic, I find Accordance isn't really that interested in that market.  They have Catholic materials but only very basic ones.  Two of the most respected commentaries from a Catholic perspective that are relatively recent are the Ignatius and the Navarre.  Neither is available in Accordance and they are in Logos.  I'm seriously looking at getting Logos just for the Navarre OT and NT commentaries.

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I'm invested in Accordance because over a decade ago it was the best that would run on my Mac.  But as a Catholic, I find Accordance isn't really that interested in that market.  They have Catholic materials but only very basic ones.  Two of the most respected commentaries from a Catholic perspective that are relatively recent are the Ignatius and the Navarre.  Neither is available in Accordance and they are in Logos.  I'm seriously looking at getting Logos just for the Navarre OT and NT commentaries.

 

I do not know what catholic items Accordance may have in the pipeline. They have for years offered the Navarra translation which is a spanish study Bible from the same institution. The catholic offerings over at FL in there Verbum department are more robust without doubt, and indeed the lack of original language support in the deuterocanonical books in Accordance is more than a little disappointing. That said Accordance offers several important Roman Catholic works and while I use the Navarre Bible occasionally (couple times week) I find it highly overrated (just my opinion). If  we compare two very small sections of the CCSS (which Accordance offers) and NB, I do not think one would feel hard done by with the CCSS other than it is NT only.

 
__________________________________________________
Blessing of the Children (10:13–16)
 
 
13 And people were bringing children to him that he might touch them, but the disciples rebuked them. 14 When Jesus saw this he became indignant and said to them, “Let the children come to me; do not prevent them, for the kingdom of God belongs to such as these. 15 Amen, I say to you, whoever does not accept the kingdom of God like a child will not enter it.” 16 Then he embraced them and blessed them, placing his hands on them.
 
 
  OT: Gen 48:14–16; Ps 115:14–15
  NT: Mark 9:36–37; Acts 2:39; 1 Pet 2:2. // Matt 18:3; 19:13–15; Luke 18:15–17
  Catechism: becoming a child, 526, 2785; the gift of children, 2373–79; laying on hands, 699
  Lectionary: Common of Pastors; Infant Baptism; Christian Initiation Apart from the Easter Vigil
 
10:13 This pronouncement about children immediately follows one about marriage—not accidentally, since Mark is grouping together teachings on the implications of discipleship for ordinary life. People, probably both mothers and fathers, were bringing children to Jesus, not only for healing but simply that he might touch them. The blessing of children through the laying on of hands was an ancient Israelite practice, usually done by the child’s father (Gen 27:30; 48:14–16). Not surprisingly, parents wanted their children to be blessed by the renowned miracle-working rabbi from Nazareth. But those approaching Jesus often have to overcome obstacles (Mark 2:4; 7:27; 10:48). Here it is the reprimand of the disciples, who perhaps with good intentions are trying to protect Jesus from what they deem a nuisance. In their view, Jesus has more important things to do than attend to children, who had no status in the culture of the time. Once again they have fumbled, completely forgetting his teaching that to receive a child is to receive him (9:36–37).
10:14–15 This is the only instance in the Gospels where Jesus becomes indignant, a term indicating outrage at an offense—in this case the disciples’ attempt to hinder little ones from coming to him. Jesus states in the strongest possible terms his desire that children be granted access to him. He then gives an explanation that must have taken his disciples aback. The kingdom of God has been the whole subject of his preaching and ministry (1:15; 4:11; 9:1). It sums up everything to which the disciples aspire—and now he says it belongs to these little people whom they were just shooing away? Once again Jesus is overturning their whole scale of values. To explain further, he makes a solemn pronouncement: whoever does not accept the kingdom of God like a child will not enter it. All are called to be “children” in relation to the kingdom. What is it about children that makes them such apt recipients of the kingdom? Children have no accomplishments with which to earn God’s favor, no status that makes them worthy. In their dependency they exemplify the only disposition that makes entrance into the kingdom possible: simply to receive it as a pure, unmerited gift (see Matt 5:3).
10:16 Jesus shows the children even more care and affection than their parents sought: he embraced and blessed them, placing his hands on them. It is the second time he has shown the warmth of his love for children (see 9:36). In so doing he reveals the disposition of God toward all his sons and daughters, his desire to bless them and enfold them in his embrace. Jesus’ action is a parable in gesture, complementing his earlier parables of the kingdom (4:1–33): to receive the kingdom is as simple, trusting, and humble an action as receiving the embrace of Jesus. Indeed, to enter the kingdom is nothing other than to enter into a relationship with Jesus.
 
 
  LIVING TRADITION
  St. Thérèse on Receiving the Kingdom like a Child
    What does it mean to be a child before God? “It is to recognize our nothingness, to expect everything from God as a little child expects everything from its father; it is to be disquieted about nothing, and not to be set on gaining our living.… To be little is not attributing to oneself the virtues that one practices, believing oneself capable of anything, but to recognize that God places this treasure in the hands of his little child to be used when necessary; but it remains always God’s treasure. Finally, it is not to become discouraged over one’s faults, for children fail often, but they are too little to hurt themselves very much.”a
 
 
 
Reflection and Application (10:13–16)
 
Jesus’ command to let the children come to him, along with the references in Acts to the baptism of entire households (Acts 16:15, 33; 18:8), formed part of the ancient Church’s rationale for the practice of infant baptism. Origen (ca. 185–254), and later St. Augustine (354–430), regarded infant baptism as a tradition received from the apostles.5 St. Irenaeus considered it a matter of course that the baptized should include “infants and small children.”6 Several Fathers, including Basil, Gregory of Nyssa, Ambrose, John Chrysostom, Jerome, and Augustine, vigorously reacted against the postponement of baptism, which they viewed as parental negligence, and begged parents not to delay the sacrament since it is necessary for salvation.
 
 
Mary Healy, The Gospel of Mark, Catholic Commentary on Sacred Scripture (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2008), 198–199.

 

 

__________________________________________________
 
 
 
Jesus and the children
10:13–16. This Gospel account has an attractive freshness and vividness about it which may be connected with St Peter, from whom St Mark would have taken the story. It is one of the few occasions when the Gospels tell us that Christ became angry. What provoked his anger was the disciples’ intolerance: they felt that these people bringing children to Jesus were a nuisance: it meant a waste of his time; Christ had more serious things to do than be involved with little children. The disciples were well-intentioned; it was just that they were applying the wrong criteria. What Jesus had told them quite recently had not registered: “Whoever receives one such child in my name receives me; and whoever receives me, receives not me but him who sent me” (Mk 9:37).
Our Lord also stresses that a Christian has to become like a child to enter the Kingdom of heaven. “To be little you have to believe as children believe, to love as children love, to abandon yourself as children do …, to pray as children pray” (St Josemaría Escrivá, Holy Rosary, Prologue).
Our Lord’s words express simply and graphically the key doctrine of man’s divine sonship: God is our Father and we are his sons and daughters, his children; the whole of religion is summed up in the relationship of a son with his good Father. This awareness of God as Father involves a sense of dependence on our Father in heaven and trusting abandonment to his loving providence—in the way a child trusts its father or mother; the humility of recognizing that we can do nothing by ourselves; simplicity and sincerity, which make us straightforward and honest in our dealings with God and man.
 
 
Saint Mark’s Gospel, The Navarre Bible (Dublin; New York: Four Courts Press; Scepter Publishers, 2005), 104–105.
 
______________________________________________
 
-dan
 
PS: I did run the notes from the Navarra translation through Google Translate and found the same quote along with similar themed notes but not exactly the same thing and of course needing to utilized google translate is hardly an ideal method of study but I was curious about how close it's notes were to the larger english work and was shocked that in this case they were close to the same length in size albeit with slightly different texts.
 
PPS: I am not trying to dissuade you from Verbum as I use it ever day just wanted to state Accordance is not a bad choice for Catholics either.
Edited by Daniel Francis
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Just honestly, I've barely found any must-have Catholic resources, only one would be RSV and that one is not explicitly Catholic - just strongly favoured only by Catholics nowadays and it's very easy to recommend it to fellows in EU. What I'd like would be something newer and more academic on Aquinas than even Vebum offers - they had some sales but I didn't buy anything - actually they had one good suitable resources last Month 15% off but even so I didn't buy it as it's a very long process to build an Aquinas library: I haven't spotted Summa Theologica in Latin only - non-bilingual or probably just skimmed past it if it costs hundreds reg. price. So mostly because of the latter aspect actually.

 

Regarding commentaries, by building up decent coverage by individual volume purchase I cover this facet. After the 1943 decision I don't think it's necessary to publish solely Catholic series.

 

Verbum 7 Silver has good value for money but I wouldn't recommend it now, it's not the right time, it's a fairly old hand-curated boxed product, with contracts negotiated in 2015 when they had a Catholic product manager the last time. With the long hiatus of that they didn't have one I have very low expectations for version 8, so skip that one too! Gold level starts to include resources I have elsewhere and I don't buy AYBD under advanced BIble Study software because of the sticker shock even during the VERY best sales under actual platforms - instead I it was gifted to me by a girl upon my wish under a bare-bones platform for cheaper than it ever has and likely ever will come out under Verbum or Accordance. Additionally as I have NIDB both digital and print + IDB in print, I really mean it that AYBD under Verbum Gold 8 would add ZERO in currency. Then I have NIB under Accordance and IB under WORDsearch. Not denying that with those there remains a difference to the AYBD approach, but still!

 

What I would suggest as a new Accordance aquisition: A journal such as CBQ.

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I'm invested in Accordance because over a decade ago it was the best that would run on my Mac.  But as a Catholic, I find Accordance isn't really that interested in that market.  They have Catholic materials but only very basic ones.  Two of the most respected commentaries from a Catholic perspective that are relatively recent are the Ignatius and the Navarre.  Neither is available in Accordance and they are in Logos.  I'm seriously looking at getting Logos just for the Navarre OT and NT commentaries.

 

As I mentioned in this same thread, we are at the point where we can work with almost any publisher to acquire new titles, and we encourage users to request must-have titles. We read every request, and also look to see what kind of additional feedback those requests generate from other users. 

 

We recently licensed, but have not yet developed, The Wisdom Commentary (Liturgical Press). And as you probably saw, we have already released Berit Olam, and Sacra Pagina. And we're certainly open to acquiring more. Sometimes with new publishers it can take some time to work out details, but if a title is available on another platform that usually means they have a system in place for digital rights and distribution.

 

So, all that to say, if it comes to a must-have resource, request it, and we will do our best to look into and determine if it is feasible for us to do.

 

Thanks for the feedback and support.

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…the lack of original language support in the deuterocanonical books in Accordance is more than a little disappointing.

 

 

This came up in discussion just today. It's something we looked into when we originally released the NRSV with Strong's, but sidelined it due some significant hurdles in terms of technology, and textual matters (e.g. not all books in the Apocrypha have one source, and are not entirely in one language). That said, we are discussing it again.

 

Thanks for the feedback.

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I will not speak ill of other Bible software companies, and I can confirm the integrity of the Accordance folks. BibleWorks is also a committed group. (At the big--and expensive to rent a booth--annual Society of Biblical Literature convention, they are not open for business on Sundays.) BW also has a policy of including as many Bible versions as they economically possible can. That's why they include 46 English versions alone in their base package which is similar in pricing to a parallel Accordance package. I use Accordance, BW, and Logos, and each has a purpose for me. Logos does some things that the others can't, but it is expensive. BibleWorks is easiest for me to do quick textual work, but I am familiar with its challenging-to-some interface. This year I switched and have required Accordance. They have a good pricing policy for educational orders, the interface is easier for students to pick up than BW, it has better cross-platform support, and it includes most of what I want my students to have without getting a bunch of unhelpful stuff.

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  • 7 months later...

I’ll like say that when I first tried out Logos for the first time, I opened Logos and hit the store page selling stuff.

 

But when I opened Accordance I was greeted with God’s Word in Genesis.

 

I decided then and there that Accordance was for me. Because these brothers and sisters here love the Word of God and it shows!

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Thank you, Lester, thank means a great deal to us.

 

One of Accordance's guiding principles is that the Bible is always front and central. Everything else is secondary.

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Software is a business. Christian. Bible. Or otherwise. It just is. But Accordance does a good job of putting that behind the scenes letting the product you actually have speak for itself. If it works, you'll buy more. It's a good philosophy. I use the other guys when I have to, but Accordance is my daily companion. 

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For me both are daily companions but Accordance is quicker and I had no need to prune it of advertising as was needed in the Faithlife home page screen.

 

-dan

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  • 5 months later...

I don't recommend owning another platform just for a few commentaries (whether sets or individual volumes). And I wouldn't say things are never coming to Accordance. The alternative would actually be premature releases then having to rework entire sets to new standards (which has happened extremely rarely for Accordance compared to how highly frequently Faithlife had to and still has to continually - they have their entire old catalogue as backlog for some implementations to get done). Also I would add to that notion - which is visible in their extra step of pre-pub: The competitor doesn't embrace a culture of serving and providing by taking some risk but is instead now heavy on their core group lay Evangelicals that want unquestionable answers and don't need sophisticated parameters at their hands - they have made a simplified introductory step deal which is lacking in every regard that I see as essential for even having any Bible Software in the first place. But over there the step to going to see for Yourself if things are so, is more huge than ever, still both cumbersome and expensive to get introduced to, over there. They are screaming to an audience that is actually more fitting for Accordance's customer base expansion than their's.
They have to desperately maximise profits as their programming costs are raking sky-high, they take that out on their paying customer
base. The fifth time they programmed everything anew from scratch: Version 2, Version 3 (Libronix), Version 4, Version 8, and now if not everything as they're desperately trying to implement selective download (which I had assumed never will come and is what their lead programmer also said, and to which btw I'm not gonna update).

ALL should also read or re-read this whole thread from 2017: https://www.accordancebible.com/forums/topic/21664-why-i-prefer-oaktree-software-inc/
:

There are things I still do in Logos and probably always will (because I know how in that platform and don't know how to or it's not available in Accordance). Also, I have some commentaries in Logos that will probably never be in Accordance (and that's fine with me). I'm glad Logos is available, and I'm glad I can make use of it.

 

However, the two main non-functional differences I see are the following. I'm not talking about what one program can do and the other can't or vice versa. These major non-functional differences are (1) the overall philosophy of the company [which I would describe as "earn a reasonable reward for your labor" {Accordance} vs. "maximize profits" {Logos}] and the (2) manner and corporate culture with which customers are served. Accordance's staff does very, very well. Thank you, Oak Tree / Accordance!

 

I don't have the Navarra Bible (I have the much smaller Edition so a hunch about what it is having also read a few product pages) nor CCSS (just one print volume). The latter is much too unscholarly for my uses. The Navarra Bible I would definitely not get unless it would come under Accordance. Well getting in for Latin at this point in History under competitors, would cost horrendously much - not recommended. Also the competitor doesn't carry additional Study Biblesnor has there been any progress at all towards carrying. Accordance's newly introduced NOAB 5th Edition is as fine replacement!: https://www.accordancebible.com/store/details/?pid=NOAB I would not say there really exists a level with the competitor on which to settle - for getting high end content. On the whole, getting high-end with them is uncertain, they aren't really trying as hard as it might seem that they do, they really don't and they have implemented features asked for for a very long time only just now (reading plans):

 

I do not know what catholic items Accordance may have in the pipeline. They have for years offered the Navarra translation which is a spanish study Bible from the same institution. The catholic offerings over at FL in there Verbum department are more robust without doubt, and indeed the lack of original language support in the deuterocanonical books in Accordance is more than a little disappointing. That said Accordance offers several important Roman Catholic works and while I use the Navarre Bible occasionally (couple times week) I find it highly overrated (just my opinion). If  we compare two very small sections of the CCSS (which Accordance offers) and NB, I do not think one would feel hard done by with the CCSS other than it is NT only.

 
[…]
 
PPS: I am not trying to dissuade you from Verbum as I use it ever day just wanted to state Accordance is not a bad choice for Catholics either.

 

 

 

I agree about their integrity, it's stellar. At the competitor they drop their face when announcing (or just telling Sales) about using another platform more with more contentment.
I don't need a multitude of translations in any language even though I'm oriented towards a number of languages. I'd perhaps want Farsi and Turkish.
I agree, students pick up the use of Accordance's UI. Which I can't say as much about the other platforms. I've given this weight for 3½ Years. Only this ongoing academic Year have I started to notice first-Year seminarians have an awareness of Faithlife, Accordance was more well known previously among them. Which says a lot about how FL only imagined they were tapping their imagined market.
The way Accordance has assembled base sets of four strands (English, both Biblical languages and Graphic database) is unparalleled. It could not have been done many other ways!
Truly Accordance works on both Windows and Mac while having unmatched tools, the only platform with this combination and parity of speed!
:

I will not speak ill of other Bible software companies, and I can confirm the integrity of the Accordance folks. […] BW also has a policy of including as many Bible versions as they economically possible can. That's why they include 46 English versions alone in their base package which is similar in pricing to a parallel Accordance package. I use Accordance, BW, and Logos, and each has a purpose for me. Logos does some things that the others can't, but it is expensive. BibleWorks is easiest for me to do quick textual work, but I am familiar with its challenging-to-some interface. This year I switched and have required Accordance. They have a good pricing policy for educational orders, the interface is easier for students to pick up than BW, it has better cross-platform support, and it includes most of what I want my students to have without getting a bunch of unhelpful stuff.

If You compare Verbum with Accordance, it becomes obvious both from the software architecture and the list of added datasets, that it (Verbum) is like what the term the user who has had Accordance for the longest time is sort of blaming Accordance for, if You look at Verbum this ongoing Winter: https://www.accordancebible.com/forums/topic/22820-lexicon-selection-by-text-type/?p=116395



 

I another thread (emphasis mine in the quote from it below)https://www.accordancebible.com/forums/topic/21650-the-sad-state-of-mobile-bible-software/?p=105518
That's a good point! I had not even kept in mind how limiting MS Word and Excel truly are!:

I mentioned the other day in another thread that I see tabs in Safari for iOS as well as GoodReader. The ones in GoodReader are not very "good" (pun intended), and I assume they are homegrown. I notice that even programs like MS Word or Excel (or the Apple equivalent of Pages and Numbers) for iOS only allow ONE document to be open at once. That's pretty frustrating when you need to put content side by side; yes, there are ways around it, but no one likes having to do that. Just like you can put two Bible applications side by side on an iPad Pro to accommodate four panes at a time (I've done it!), but we really don't want to have to do that. But if you compare Accordance Mobile to MS Word or Excel, at least we don't limit you to one title in your Accordance library! In fact, with popup Instant Details and User Note editing, we've essentially allowed for three panes, if but for limited instances.

Yet another thread, in which I also link at the end to the thread by R. Mansfield -- where his greatest blog post is linked: https://www.accordancebible.com/forums/topic/20932-accordance-has-risen-to-the-top/

 

In another thread:

 

I have been following this thread with interest.

 

It's always helpful to know how our customers perceive us. We appreciate your compliments and learn from your criticisms. It's not surprising to me that some prefer one program, others another, still others use both (if for different tasks).

 

By way of help, let me offer this list for evaluating Bible software programs in general:

 

1. Search engine performance (stability, speed, precision, features, platforms supported)

2. Price (initial and upgrades)

3. Resources available for purchase (quality, number, ease of use, cost, accuracy, support for a specific area of interest)

4. Training (quality, availability, cost)

5. Support (responsiveness, effectiveness, overall attitude)

6. Community (Is it friendly? Helpful? Active? Enthusiastic?)

Reply: There are differences in each regard between platforms and the most typical is for those starting out to deny or not realise that. I would add that selective downloads of Collections/base-packages is also a must as well as the quality of the Info Pane!

EDIT at :41: Small additions and typo fixes
EDIT at :55: corrected more typos I found

Edited by Unix
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