Jump to content

Psalm 24:14 Text Criticism question


Lorinda H. M. Hoover
 Share

Recommended Posts

I actually got around to doing the Psalm reading for today, and I was somewhat surprised to see that the LXX1 version of Psalm 24:14 has a phrase that both Brenton and NETS exclude in translation.  Specifically, it is:

 

 

καὶ τὸ ὄνομα κυρίου τῶν φοβουμένων αὐτόν

 

I see that there is no parallel in the MT, and it is also very repetitive of the first phrase, so I can see how it could be seen as an edition or reduplication.  But I don't have any of the apparati, so I haven't had any luck learning more about this.  Can someone enlighten me?

 

As an aside, does anyone have the Rahlf's Apparatus?  Would be helpful in this case?

 

Lorinda

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi, Lorinda!

 

Göttingen's text brackets this phrase: κραταίωμα κύριος τῶν φοβουμένων αὐτόν,
    [καὶ τὸ ὄνομα κυρίου τῶν φοβουμένων αὐτόν,]
    καὶ ἡ διαθήκη αὐτοῦ τοῦ δηλῶσαι αὐτοῖς.

 

Looks to me like the scribe had what we call a "Hallelujah breakdown" :)

 

Here's the apparatus:

Ralphs: Psalmi 24:14b > S | φοβουμ.] επικαλουμ. A ||

Gött: 14 των φοβουμενων 1°] τοις -νοις Thtp He | 142 B USa(Sa B ex corr.) RÆ Aug A’] > S SaB* LaG Ga LÆ’ 1219 = M : cf. S.-St. 2, p. 43. 60. 63. 229 | φοβουμενων 2°] επικαλουμ. A’ | του δηλωσαι = M] δηλωσαι U Hec, δηλωσει Bo LÆ

Swete: 24:14 των φοβου (1°) sup ras A1 | om και το ονομα . . . αυτον Bb vid (non inst) ℵ | φοβουμενων 2°] επικαλουμενων A | του δηλωσαι] δηλωσει ℵc.a δηλωσαι U

 

PS

If you are going to keep asking probing questions like this, sooner or later you're going to need an apparatus or two! :D

Edited by Timothy Jenney
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Lorinda,

 

  Only two comments and neither from apparatus.

 

  I have a print Brenton diglot and the additional line does not appear.

  I've been experimenting with importing a User Bible of Sinaiticus, so far just for Psalms. It also does not contain this. You can see the codex here :

 

http://codexsinaiticus.org/en/manuscript.aspx?book=26&chapter=24&lid=en&side=r&verse=14&zoomSlider=0

 

  I don't have a print edition of Rahlfs nor the apparatus in Acc.

 

Thx

D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, Dr. J.  I don't understand a lot of the abbreviations, but it looks like the phrase is omitted in some manuscripts, and in others επικαλουμενων replaces φοβουμενων.  Is that on the right track?

 

I didn't even realize there was an apparatus for Rahlfs until today.  It has gone on my wish list, along with the Gottingen Psalms, and Swete.

 

Oh for an equivalent to Metzger and/or Comfort's Text Commentary for the OT!

 

Daniel,

 

Thanks for the additional information.  Interesting to see the Sinaiticus.  What a fascinating site!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, Dr. J.  I don't understand a lot of the abbreviations, but it looks like the phrase is omitted in some manuscripts, and in others επικαλουμενων replaces φοβουμενων.  Is that on the right track?

 

I didn't even realize there was an apparatus for Rahlfs until today.  It has gone on my wish list, along with the Gottingen Psalms, and Swete.

 

Oh for an equivalent to Metzger and/or Comfort's Text Commentary for the OT!

 

Daniel,

 

Thanks for the additional information.  Interesting to see the Sinaiticus.  What a fascinating site!

 

I'd love a Metzger-like resource for the OT, as would many others, I'm sure.

 

The Rahlfs apparatus is useful, but limited. Rahlfs also compiled the apparatus for Göttingen-Psalms, which is acknowledged (including by him) to not be one of Göttingen's finer (or most comprehensive) volumes. All the same, that's the place to go if you want to have an apparatus that will make you want to throw the book across the room... in between moments of making sense of it and finding it useful for text criticism! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

P.S. The Rahlfs critical edition is freely and legally available as a PDF here. It's an earlier printing than what Accordance has, and obviously not as easy to navigate. But you could have a gander there if you needed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

κραταίωμα κύριος τῶν φοβουμένων αὐτόν,
    [καὶ τὸ ὄνομα κυρίου τῶν φοβουμένων αὐτόν,]
    καὶ ἡ διαθήκη αὐτοῦ τοῦ δηλῶσαι αὐτοῖς.

 

I'm no expert in the LXX, let alone its apparatus, but I can offer some observations.

 

While the repetition of the last three words in the first line (τῶν φοβουμένων αὐτόν) may well be an example of dittography, there is no near example of the first three words ("and the name of the lord;" Gk. καὶ τὸ ὄνομα κυρίου) from which it might have been borrowed.

Edited by Timothy Jenney
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...