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Λύχνις Δαν
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Hi ya,

 

  After one month and 17 Psalms it's very interesting. It's not like straightforward narrative from something like Genesis.

  My vocab lists indicate that while I hit a bunch of stuff there are a number of words cropping up from time to time which are frequent in the OT but non-existent in the NT that are relevant. The optative mood turns out to be important. There are frequent changes in pronoun and verbal referents which one has to keep track off. A little use of MT-LXX cross-reference to explain a few interesting anomalies. And comparisons with modern English translations from Hebrew shows some interesting differences. Those with Hebrew will no doubt be able to make more of them. And that's all before the attempt to understand what is being said. But overall very valuable to be kept at it day in day out. And definitely wondering if we need another English translation of the LXX. Anyhow by Christmas we should have a number floating around for one book :)

 

  How are the rest of you finding it ?

 

Thx

D

Edited by Daniel Semler
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I'm very impressed, Daniel - being able to do Greek Psalms while learning Hebrew and Akkadian at the same time! I'm spending most, if not all of my time writing an article about a Syriac text called The Testament of Adam and managing my Master's thesis. If I had a spare moment, I'd join you guys. It all sounds like loads of fun, and I haven't really read Greek in about a year other than the occasional comparative check in LXX, so it's very tempting. Maybe if you do it again at a later time, I can tag along! 

 

With kind regards

 

Peter

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I'm afraid I've fallen out of the habit, in part because my work schedule has been heavier.  I'm hoping to get back in the swing of things.  

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Thanx Peter, we'll see if one hasn't bitten off more than one can chew I suppose :) BTW, The Testament of Adam sounded familiar. When I was considering extra-biblical Greek options in Accordance I noticed that they have the Greek bits of this in their OT Pseudepigrapha module.

 

Hey Linda, understood. Big thanx to you for your use tool for the Psalms schedule. I use it every day.

 

The advantage of the Psalms is that they are little chunks rather than a long flowing narrative (at least so far as I have seen). Thus hopping in and out at different times doesn't lose a lot of context.

 

Thx

D

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Thanx Peter, we'll see if one hasn't bitten off more than one can chew I suppose :) BTW, The Testament of Adam sounded familiar. When I was considering extra-biblical Greek options in Accordance I noticed that they have the Greek bits of this in their OT Pseudepigrapha module.

 

Hey Linda, understood. Big thanx to you for your use tool for the Psalms schedule. I use it every day.

 

The advantage of the Psalms is that they are little chunks rather than a long flowing narrative (at least so far as I have seen). Thus hopping in and out at different times doesn't lose a lot of context.

 

Thx

D

 

That's the one! I don't have that module, though, but fortunately I have Stephen Robinson's edition of the text and his notes about the Greek fragments. I honestly hadn't heard about the text at all until my professor introduced me to it, but it's been interesting so far, and I had been looking for an opportunity to read Syriac again. Estrangela and Serta are really beautiful scripts and the language itself is 95% identical to Biblical Aramaic, so I feel right at home.

 

The first part of the text, The Hours, is basically a list of what happens each hour of the day and what these hours also are called. The first hour of the night, for instance, is called "The thanksgiving of demons". In that particular hour, the demons are so busy revering God that they won't have the time to hurt or cripple any man. The second part, the Prophecy, is a narrative where Adam tells his son Seth about how God will become a man and do wonders on the earth, followed by how Adam fell from grace by eating the forbidden fruit (which is actually a fig in one of the later recensions!). Then the text gets really interesting: While God punishes Adam, he also promises him that he will become either a god or God himself like he wanted through the resurrection of Jesus, who at that time will "put on the body of Adam". What this exactly means is a good question though. It raises more questions than it answers. There is also a third part of the text about the hierarchy of angels, but that one isn't in the oldest manuscript, which is the one I'm working with.

 

With kind regards

 

Peter

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Oh no ! That sounds interesting. Oh well, it will have to wait.

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I'm behind, but not by much. I feel behind during Greek Isaiah two years ago a number of times--even once by two weeks!--but was caught up for the last two months. So I'm not giving up.

 

But even with the vocabulary, the Psalms are harder to read than I thought they would be! Lots of low-occurring word. At least it's helping me with learning inflections of the imperative mood. Those Psalmists liked to tell people (especially God) what to do. :)

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Glad to hear it's not just me :) They are harder than Genesis which is basically simple narrative - I've not tried Isaiah. As to the imperative - I had a similar reaction. I'm thinking "imperative of entreaty" but still it was surprising. I also want a copy of Symmachus but that's gone with the ages I'm afraid.

 

Thx

D

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Yeah--I even knew that poetry is always harder (in any language) than prose, but this even exceeds the difficulty I was expecting! It is beautiful, though, when I can do a whole verse at a time (sometimes two!) without looking anything up.

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Indeed and let's not forget the optative ! Got me again !

 

Thx

D

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That reminds me: I am going to take the new Research feature for a spin right now, searching grammars, etc. for "optative."

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Steven's has a good little table and explanation of the morphology which is handy.

 

Thx

D

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