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HansK
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Please add this Study Bible (By E.W. Bullinger and C. Welch) as a module.

This work is now in several other packages.

I have a contact who has the files. It's the same person "behind" the TSK Enhanced, just added to Accordance.

 

Thanks,

 

Hans

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  • 3 years later...

Som information about The Companion Bible

 

​Study Bibles that are generally recognized as being highly biased include… The Companion Bible.

This study Bible is the work of E. W. Bullinger, the originator of the doctrine known as Ultradispensationalism (also called “Bullingerism”).  While the Bible affirms that the church was established in Acts 2, Bullinger’s “ultradispensationalism” claims the church began at some point after Acts 2 (i.e., Acts 9-13 or even after Acts 28).   Bullinger’s views also included what he described as “mortality of the soul,” which means the soul ceases between death and the resurrection at which time the soul is recreated.  This is very similar to the so-called “soul sleep” of the Jehovah’s Witnesses.
 
Webb, David. Accurately Handling the Word of Truth, p.50
 
 
Originally published in six volumes, this massive work of more than 2,150 pages contains reams of valuable, though sometimes eccentric, study helps. Each book is introduced and outlined, but each section and paragraph is also outlined in further detail in the notes that parallel the text. The notes themselves contain explanatory, topical, linguistic, and historical insights and are keyed to detailed studies in the 198 appendices that follow the text. The writer, E. W. Bullinger, is known for his ultradispensational teaching in other writings, but in the Companion Bible his dispensationalism is limited to the book introductions and appendices and is hardly more radical than Scofield or Ryrie.
 
How to choose a Study Bible by John R. Kohlenberger III, pp.5–6
 
 
K.E. Bailey said the following words about Bullinger which seem totally justified: ‘E.W. Bullinger, wrote The Companion Bible, in which he discredited the discipline for a full generation’ 
 
Meynet, Roland. Rhetorical Analysis–An Introduction to Biblical Rhetoric. p.130
Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, Supplement Series 256
 
 
Of these ultra-dispensational systems, one in particular has come into prominence of late years, which, for want of a better name, is generally called “Bullingerism,” owing to the fact that it was first advocated some years ago by Dr. E. W. Bullinger, a clergyman of the Church of England. These views have been widely spread through the notes of “The Companion Bible,” a work partly edited by Dr. Bullinger, though he died before it was completed. This Bible has many valuable features and has been a help in certain respects to God’s servants who have used it conservatively, but it contains interpretations which are utterly subversive of the truth. Some of Dr. Bullinger’s positions are glaringly opposed to what is generally accepted as orthodox teaching, as, for instance, the sleep of the soul between death and resurrection; and it is a most significant fact that while he did not apparently fully commit himself to any eschatological position as to the final state of the impenitent, most of his followers in Great Britain have gone off into annihilation, and there is quite a sect in America who began with his teaching who now are restorationists of the broadest type, teaching what they are pleased to call universal reconciliation, which to their minds involves the final salvation not only of all men, but of Satan and all the fallen angels. These two views, diverse as they are, are nevertheless the legitimate offspring of the ultra-dispensational system to which we refer.
 
Ironside, H. A. Wrongly Dividing the Word of Truth: Ultra-Dispensationalism Examined in the Light of Holy Scripture (from www)
NB Ironside was also a dispensationalist.
 
So that would be a "No thanks" from me. Besides, it is freely available on the Internet.
And the graphical/typographical layout of Bullinger's notes would make it difficult to program in Accordance, which has struggled with other modules that depend on structure for layout.
Edited by Alistair
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  • 3 weeks later...

Interesting comments on the bias of study bibles. I certainly don't agree with Bullinger on all points - and for that matter - I don't agree with everything Webb or Ironside have written  either. - Comparing Bullinger to the JeHo's. is a stretch at best -  and his appendices in the companion Bible are a wealth of information for - however the study notes themselves throughout are extremely useful and do not show any bias other than to the truth of scripture - If his opinions on various topics show themselves - it would be in those appendices - but not the notes throughout the Bible. I have two copies of the Companion Bible in my library - though the print is extremely small - and I would prefer the Accordance integration - for sermon and class prep.  - All study Bibles interject the views of their own - as do commentaries. - One needs to look no further than Scofield to see the pitfalls of this.
Regardless the issue is rather that Accordance should have a well rounded library - and for the several thousand dollar investment that I've made in their platform I would expect them to offer a library that compares with their competitors (Logos, etc.) - of which the Bullinger module is available. Compared to Logos and others - Accordance is behind the curve in what is available in their library. - On a side note, I find the amount of works available on Accordance by NT Wright - much more offensive and unwelcome - and extremely dangerous.

Edited by uponthecircle
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Please respect the forum guidelines regarding discussion of theological perspectives.

 

It is not our aim to offer a complete library of theological works. We are certainly open to including a broad range of perspectives, but acquiring the licenses and preparing the materials for Accordance take time. As you can see above, the response to the request for Bullinger has been less than overwhelming.

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(Logos, etc.) - of which the Bullinger module is available. Compared to Logos and others

 

It is not available in Logos other than you can place a community bid on it (a process for FL to determine if there is enough interest for them to add a public domain work).  It has about 60% enough interest for FL to consider making it, meaning it may never be pursued. I am not in the market for this volume, I did own it in print at one time. It always amazes how people time and again say something is available in Logos when it is listed in their search engine but has not enough interest for them to pursue a contract or in the Public Domain case has not enough interest for them to start inputting. Just because it comes up doesn't mean you can buy it... I even have one item in my Logos order list that was ordered way back in 2012, has been under contract for years and still no sign of it, so even under development there is no guarantee of a reasonable release time.

 

-dan

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When I think about a Study Bible I think what will it add beyond what I already know and the resources I already have.

 

As I have healthy collection of Study Bibles in Accordance, as PDFs, and even on paper, and knowing what little I have gleaned from other sources about the Companion Bible (see my posting above), I conclude that the extra information it would supply beyond, say, the NIV Zondervan Study Bible or the NLT Study Bible is, frankly, not something I want.

 

The comment by "uponthecircle" above about the notes throughout the Bible is valid to some degree, expect I would argue that a more recent study Bible would draw on almost one hundred more years of scholarship and research and be compiled by dozens of scholars/teachers.

 

I think this must also be part of the reasoning behind Oak Tree's statement above they are not pursuing it (note I do not speak for them).

 

Is there a great demand? Apparently not, according to Helen.

 

 

Would it be worth the time and money for Oak Tree to develop this resource? No, according to Helen.

 

Is it an important or historically valuable work? Depends on your point of view. For me, no, but the three people who started this thread say Yes.

 

Does it add much new content beyond that found in other resources already supplied by Oak Tree? I think not.

 

For a dispensationalist work there is the Scofield Study Bible, demonstrably more important and significant than the Companion Bible, which is available for Accordance.

(And possibly Dake's works as well, also available for Accordance, though I do not know enough about Dake to have an informed opinion on this point).

 

Also I note there is a tendency for Oak Tree to supply recent/modern/copyrighted modules than older, public domain or out-of-copyright materials.

I suspect this is because the majority of its customers are requesting such modules.

 

 

Note to admins: move this thread to Module Requests, rather than Feature Requests.

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Helen, please remove the uninformed, biased comments by Alistair.

 

 

Hans

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While I see Alistair's comments as strong I am not sure I would call them completely uniformed as he seems to have done a bit of research into it. He obviously is not a fan but that is ok. Perhaps I am taking it better because I am not a huge fan of the work. 

 

-dan

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I have moved the topic, thanks, Alistair.

 

A big factor in our choice of materials to develop for Accordance is the availability of an etext. Almost all modern works have such an etext (in all kinds of software, but we are used to that). Public domain works have often been etexted by people who wanted to make them available on computer. However, there is a large body of work which is still under copyright, but was not created or never preserved electronically. In these cases there is no point in etexting unless one also has a license, and the cost of etexting has to be considered in the decision of whether to pursue a license for such an older work.

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Som information about The Companion Bible

 

​Study Bibles that are generally recognized as being highly biased include… The Companion Bible.

This study Bible is the work of E. W. Bullinger, the originator of the doctrine known as Ultradispensationalism (also called “Bullingerism”).  While the Bible affirms that the church was established in Acts 2, Bullinger’s “ultradispensationalism” claims the church began at some point after Acts 2 (i.e., Acts 9-13 or even after Acts 28).   Bullinger’s views also included what he described as “mortality of the soul,” which means the soul ceases between death and the resurrection at which time the soul is recreated.  This is very similar to the so-called “soul sleep” of the Jehovah’s Witnesses.
 
Webb, David. Accurately Handling the Word of Truth, p.50
 
 
Originally published in six volumes, this massive work of more than 2,150 pages contains reams of valuable, though sometimes eccentric, study helps. Each book is introduced and outlined, but each section and paragraph is also outlined in further detail in the notes that parallel the text. The notes themselves contain explanatory, topical, linguistic, and historical insights and are keyed to detailed studies in the 198 appendices that follow the text. The writer, E. W. Bullinger, is known for his ultradispensational teaching in other writings, but in the Companion Bible his dispensationalism is limited to the book introductions and appendices and is hardly more radical than Scofield or Ryrie.
 
How to choose a Study Bible by John R. Kohlenberger III, pp.5–6
 
 
K.E. Bailey said the following words about Bullinger which seem totally justified: ‘E.W. Bullinger, wrote The Companion Bible, in which he discredited the discipline for a full generation’ 
 
Meynet, Roland. Rhetorical Analysis–An Introduction to Biblical Rhetoric. p.130
Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, Supplement Series 256
 
 
Of these ultra-dispensational systems, one in particular has come into prominence of late years, which, for want of a better name, is generally called “Bullingerism,” owing to the fact that it was first advocated some years ago by Dr. E. W. Bullinger, a clergyman of the Church of England. These views have been widely spread through the notes of “The Companion Bible,” a work partly edited by Dr. Bullinger, though he died before it was completed. This Bible has many valuable features and has been a help in certain respects to God’s servants who have used it conservatively, but it contains interpretations which are utterly subversive of the truth. Some of Dr. Bullinger’s positions are glaringly opposed to what is generally accepted as orthodox teaching, as, for instance, the sleep of the soul between death and resurrection; and it is a most significant fact that while he did not apparently fully commit himself to any eschatological position as to the final state of the impenitent, most of his followers in Great Britain have gone off into annihilation, and there is quite a sect in America who began with his teaching who now are restorationists of the broadest type, teaching what they are pleased to call universal reconciliation, which to their minds involves the final salvation not only of all men, but of Satan and all the fallen angels. These two views, diverse as they are, are nevertheless the legitimate offspring of the ultra-dispensational system to which we refer.
 
Ironside, H. A. Wrongly Dividing the Word of Truth: Ultra-Dispensationalism Examined in the Light of Holy Scripture (from www)
NB Ironside was also a dispensationalist.
 
So that would be a "No thanks" from me. Besides, it is freely available on the Internet.
And the graphical/typographical layout of Bullinger's notes would make it difficult to program in Accordance, which has struggled with other modules that depend on structure for layout.

 

All Bible scholars are biased (except maybe the ones I agree with!). I don't know of any of Bullinger's distinctive ideas with which I agree,

BUT:

All theologians are biased.

What is it in Bible or theology study which is not debated?

They don't even all agree whether God exists or not.

Bullinger, IMHO, is someone who could get a man to think out of the box. (Could there have been 4 thieves at the cross - 2 pairs of them?)

I see no reason to oppose his words being in Accordance.

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I don't oppose it being added... but I wouldn't likely buy it. And if it was a choice lets say between Accordance making this or spending half the effort making another Study Bible, it may make more sense to go with the easier one. I have no idea if they will make this one or not but there is something to be said about going after older works. I know the authors of the New Scofield Bible (which is in Accordance) would have covered things from a very similar viewpoint and one would guess when the work was done in the late 60s they would have taken the scholarship of the Companion Bible into consideration. I am not trying to say the CB has nothing to offer. Just that often times going after older works is often times very expensive to process and they have to weigh out how many people want it, and do Accordance have something of a similar nature already? Do they want to say put off pursuing other works to do this one. I am not for or against it but I do understand, even when it is a disappointment, we do not get everything we want in Accordance or indeed any Bible software. The one thing that can be said about FL having it in their community pricing is there appears to be not even remotely enough interest for them to pursue it, leading one to ask if it has been deemed a project with not enough support there after many years would it be prudent for Accordance to pursue it? (This is a question I cannot answer just tossing it out).

 

-dan

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This would be great to have. But it looks like it won't happen. 

I'm becoming more and more convinced that if I want something besides a steady stream of reformed authors and commentaries, I am going to be forced to use more than one brand of software. I know others here do, I just have resisted it. 

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This would be great to have. But it looks like it won't happen. 

I'm becoming more and more convinced that if I want something besides a steady stream of reformed authors and commentaries, I am going to be forced to use more than one brand of software. I know others here do, I just have resisted it. 

 

That's why it's important that we post our module requests in the forum, and discuss their various merits and the reasons we want such modules available in Accordance.

Not many of us live in a seminary library, so it often is the first place I get to hear about many books, commentaries, and other works.

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I hesitate to post more about this.

 

The e-text is available for Accordance, as I contacted Mr. Morton of Bible Analyzer and brought Accordance in contact with him. They never contacted him after that.  I know, because I wrote him about this, just to check.

I do realise that Accordance needs to convert the files for their use, so that takes time and money.

The demand is not that big here on the forums :-)

No hard feelings here, I am blessed with what I have.

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I want primarily catholic-Lutheran-Anglican works. But I accept that I will not always get those items I am glad to have Wright and many fine Catholic works but I also utilize the best of most traditions including evangelical Methodist and Presbyterian. I will admit I am not a huge fan of reformed but I am not opposed to good scholarship there either.

-dan
 

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I am very happy with what Accordance has and my wish list is fairly small and I now have everything I must have but like alister, i find the forum for hearing about resources I would not normally come across and could enhance my library.

 

there are some oup volumes that I am resisting buying in hard back as I hope they will one day appear in accordance and living with the Accordance first editions.

 

My main interest where there is a gap in the Accordance store is in orthodox material and my hardcopy library from these publishers, for example, has increased since i have had Accordance:

https://www.svspress.com/pages/About-SVS-Press.html

http://www.orthodoxresearchinstitute.org/store/oripress.html

 

I still only have Accordance and my foray into other bible apps on iOS has convinced me that if its not in Accordance and unlikely to arrive or I can’t wait, I will get hard copy if i really must have it.

Edited by ukfraser
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  • 2 months later...

I don't oppose it being added... but I wouldn't likely buy it. And if it was a choice lets say between Accordance making this or spending half the effort making another Study Bible, it may make more sense to go with the easier one. I have no idea if they will make this one or not but there is something to be said about going after older works. I know the authors of the New Scofield Bible (which is in Accordance) would have covered things from a very similar viewpoint and one would guess when the work was done in the late 60s they would have taken the scholarship of the Companion Bible into consideration. I am not trying to say the CB has nothing to offer. Just that often times going after older works is often times very expensive to process and they have to weigh out how many people want it, and do Accordance have something of a similar nature already? Do they want to say put off pursuing other works to do this one. I am not for or against it but I do understand, even when it is a disappointment, we do not get everything we want in Accordance or indeed any Bible software. The one thing that can be said about FL having it in their community pricing is there appears to be not even remotely enough interest for them to pursue it, leading one to ask if it has been deemed a project with not enough support there after many years would it be prudent for Accordance to pursue it? (This is a question I cannot answer just tossing it out).

 

-dan

New Scofield very similar in POV to Bullinger? Having graduated from a college founded by C I Scofield, I can assure you that Scofield is not "very similar" to Bullinger.  I can't imagine the editors of the New Scofield giving any respect to the distinctive ideas of Bullinger.  I suggest that you read Charles Ryrie's Dispensationalism Today to get the sober attitude of the disciples of Scofield on Bullinger.  And as to Logos' Community Pricing offerings, one may get some great bargains through that system, but you may have to wait years to get the prizes.

Edited by Enoch
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My apologies I only knew both were dispensatalists. From the brief look I gave the CB it seemed to have similar ideas to SB I was very familiar with but I was never an ardent user of the CB.

 

-Dan

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My interest in the matter of dispensationalism and covenant theology began by reading NIVAC in Accordance.

 

"Commentator Scot McKnight oversimplifies but gives a useful insight by describing two basic ways in which we can understand how God relates to his people. Covenant theology affirms that God has always related to his people in one unchanging way, which is seen in the covenant with Abraham. Dispensationalism, on the other hand, teaches that God operates in different ways during different periods or epochs of history, called dispensations. The idea of progressive revelation is therefore key to understanding dispensationalism. Covenant theology affirms that God has one people, namely the saints, elect or chosen of both the Old Testament era and those of the New Testament era. Dispensationalism says that God has two people, Israel (God’s earthly people) and the church (God’s heavenly people). "

 

McKnight, Scot. Galatians (NIVAC). pp. 173–174.

The Scofield study Bible, New King James version.
 Oxford University Press Inc., New York NY USA (2002) See p. ix

see also Holmes, Stephen R. Baptist theology
. T & T Clark, London UK & New York NY USA (2012)

 

I have been reading Vern S. Poythress' book, Understanding dispensationalists (P&R publishing, 2e 1994), which has been praised for its fair and balanced presentation of dispensationalism even though Poythress claims to be a covenant theologian. Recommended.

 

Also there is a useful chart of dispensationalists here (http://www.withchrist.org/JND.pdf) that show the links between Darby, Scofield, Chafer, Bullinger and others. (It doesn't mention Edward Irving, however.)

Edited by Alistair
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  • 4 months later...

 

Som information about The Companion Bible

 

​Study Bibles that are generally recognized as being highly biased include… The Companion Bible.

This study Bible is the work of E. W. Bullinger, the originator of the doctrine known as Ultradispensationalism (also called “Bullingerism”).  While the Bible affirms that the church was established in Acts 2, Bullinger’s “ultradispensationalism” claims the church began at some point after Acts 2 (i.e., Acts 9-13 or even after Acts 28).   Bullinger’s views also included what he described as “mortality of the soul,” which means the soul ceases between death and the resurrection at which time the soul is recreated.  This is very similar to the so-called “soul sleep” of the Jehovah’s Witnesses.
 
Webb, David. Accurately Handling the Word of Truth, p.50
 
 
Originally published in six volumes, this massive work of more than 2,150 pages contains reams of valuable, though sometimes eccentric, study helps. Each book is introduced and outlined, but each section and paragraph is also outlined in further detail in the notes that parallel the text. The notes themselves contain explanatory, topical, linguistic, and historical insights and are keyed to detailed studies in the 198 appendices that follow the text. The writer, E. W. Bullinger, is known for his ultradispensational teaching in other writings, but in the Companion Bible his dispensationalism is limited to the book introductions and appendices and is hardly more radical than Scofield or Ryrie.
 
How to choose a Study Bible by John R. Kohlenberger III, pp.5–6
 
 
K.E. Bailey said the following words about Bullinger which seem totally justified: ‘E.W. Bullinger, wrote The Companion Bible, in which he discredited the discipline for a full generation’ 
 
Meynet, Roland. Rhetorical Analysis–An Introduction to Biblical Rhetoric. p.130
Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, Supplement Series 256
 
 
Of these ultra-dispensational systems, one in particular has come into prominence of late years, which, for want of a better name, is generally called “Bullingerism,” owing to the fact that it was first advocated some years ago by Dr. E. W. Bullinger, a clergyman of the Church of England. These views have been widely spread through the notes of “The Companion Bible,” a work partly edited by Dr. Bullinger, though he died before it was completed. This Bible has many valuable features and has been a help in certain respects to God’s servants who have used it conservatively, but it contains interpretations which are utterly subversive of the truth. Some of Dr. Bullinger’s positions are glaringly opposed to what is generally accepted as orthodox teaching, as, for instance, the sleep of the soul between death and resurrection; and it is a most significant fact that while he did not apparently fully commit himself to any eschatological position as to the final state of the impenitent, most of his followers in Great Britain have gone off into annihilation, and there is quite a sect in America who began with his teaching who now are restorationists of the broadest type, teaching what they are pleased to call universal reconciliation, which to their minds involves the final salvation not only of all men, but of Satan and all the fallen angels. These two views, diverse as they are, are nevertheless the legitimate offspring of the ultra-dispensational system to which we refer.
 
Ironside, H. A. Wrongly Dividing the Word of Truth: Ultra-Dispensationalism Examined in the Light of Holy Scripture (from www)
NB Ironside was also a dispensationalist.
 
So that would be a "No thanks" from me. Besides, it is freely available on the Internet.
And the graphical/typographical layout of Bullinger's notes would make it difficult to program in Accordance, which has struggled with other modules that depend on structure for layout.

 

Hi,

 

Mr Webb accurately describes Bullinger's position on the soul but where is his quote of Bullinger's material? He also does not seem to know where exactly Bullinger begins the church? Again, where is the evidence? Does he state where in the Companion Bible if at all? Does he see more than one church in the NT? Informed reviews are appreciated while 3rd party hear say is not useful.

 

Kohlenberger does us a favor with his review and makes the Companion Bible sound very useful. Is the fact that some articles are eccentric a deal killer? First find me a study bible that is not eccentric in some position and also not milquetoast useless!

 

Ironside gets some right and gets some wrong. "This Bible has many valuable features and has been a help..." is what a study bible is all about and that is what we want. "These views [ultra-dispensationalism or Bullingerism] have been widely spread through the notes of “The Companion Bible,” and yet we are given no examples! Will we find something in the appendices, yes, but in the actual notes accompanying the text? Again, give us some egregious examples to prove the point...if any can be found please. "Some of Dr. Bullinger’s positions are glaringly opposed to what is generally accepted as orthodox teaching," is asserted but by whose standard? Bullinger was one of the original European fundamentalists and whether you are a Bullinger type or an Ironside type of Fundamentalist, someone is going to call you unorthodox in much of your teaching, just ask any Reformed Covenant Theologian. "for instance, the sleep of the soul between death and resurrection;" umm, Mr Webb understands Bullinger's position but Ironside does not, Bullinger did not teach "soul sleep" and this gives cause to worry whether Ironside understood anything about Bullinger's teaching which he apparently did not! Then Ironside reports: "it is a most significant fact that while he did not apparently fully commit himself to any eschatological position as to the final state of the impenitent," to which we again make a plea for quotes or evidence which are blatantly missing for such a serious accusation. We expect more from Ironside but are sadly disappointed. Then Ironside pulls out a real dousy from his hat: "most of his followers in Great Britain have gone off into annihilation, and there is quite a sect in America who began with his teaching who now are restorationists of the broadest type, teaching what they are pleased to call universal reconciliation, which to their minds involves the final salvation not only of all men, but of Satan and all the fallen angels. These two views, diverse as they are, are nevertheless the legitimate offspring of the ultra-dispensational system to which we refer." Well that is outright slander by a man of God against a man of God and it is as false as can be. Ironside will have to apologise at the Bema for that egregious lie.

 

Finally I would ask why the following comment by Bailey "seems totally justified"?  ‘E.W. Bullinger, wrote The Companion Bible, in which he discredited the discipline for a full generation.’ The fact is that Bullinger was 100 years ahead of his time with the presentation of his study bible, as well as, in recognizing Chiastic (as they are called now) structure in the Bible and his work on Figures of Speech is still today promoted as the authority by many scholars. When one sees and examines Bullinger's structures, one will immediately recognize Bailey is rather ignorant.

 

There is a widespread ignorance of Bullinger and his value today. A lot of pure nonsense is repeated by those who have never read his work let alone studied it. His study bible deserves respect and those who have not used it really are not any more qualified to speak on the matter than they are to speak about "ultra-dispensationalism"! (Another subject upon which most are ignorant!) Bullinger had some strange views to be sure but so did Scofield. That will not detract in the least the use of his Companion Bible!

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My interest in the matter of dispensationalism and covenant theology began by reading NIVAC in Accordance.

 

....

 

Also there is a useful chart of dispensationalists here (http://www.withchrist.org/JND.pdf) that show the links between Darby, Scofield, Chafer, Bullinger and others. (It doesn't mention Edward Irving, however.)

Hi,

 

The chart has a number of errors in it. Rather see the Wiki article on Dispensationalism which has a chart on the History of Dispensationalism under the History heading.

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  • 3 weeks later...

My apologies I only knew both were dispensatalists. From the brief look I gave the CB it seemed to have similar ideas to SB I was very familiar with but I was never an ardent user of the CB.

 

-Dan

Dan, all Christians have to be in some measure dispensationalists unless they believe in following all the details of the Law of Moses; they have to accept the POV that while all scripture is for them, it is not all to them.  The question is HOW dispensational are they? With Bullinger, as I recall, he did not have the Church of this era founded until the end of Acts; with the practical result that the Church should not do water baptism nor have the Lord's Supper since not prescribed in the Pastoral Epistles / epistles written after the end of Acts.  This POV is not that of the New (or old) Scofield Reference Bible or its editors.

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