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Found 23 results

  1. Hello, Is there a way to search "caps-sensitive"? Here's what I'd like to do. I want to search for all of the times in my ESV translation that the word "Father" appears, but only when the ESV capitalizes it. That will help me weed through the 979 times it appears referring to any "father" as opposed to specifically God the "Father." Thanks!
  2. I’m trying to create a Hebrew construct search. There are many places in the Hebrew Bible where there is a compound subject (X + Y, or X + Y + Z, etc.), and each member participates in some action, yet the verb is rendered in the masculine singular. Ex: Gn 9:23, 11:29, 24:50, 34:20, Ju 14:5. How would I create a construct search to find all examples of this phenomenon? Thanks for the help! I’m trying to get a better handle on how the construct search works in Accordance and make my research more efficient at the same time. Kind regards, David
  3. Hi there, apologies if this has been asked already (I couldn’t find the topic if it has). I was hoping to add parallel panes for Greek Syntax and Diagrams but those menus are greyed out. What might I need to have installed for those features to work? Accordance 12.3.2 GNT-T UBS4 etc Thanks!
  4. Here's an interesting challenge, based on a Nerdy Language Majors post. How can we search for a Greek pronoun with no known antecedent? For the purposes of this search, let's limit that search to one where the pronoun is not connected to an antecedent in the Syntax tree.
  5. Timothy Jenney

    #135) Syntax

    [Accordance 11.1.4 Advanced] Over the past few years we’ve worked hard to make our original language syntax searches faster, more accurate, and more intuitive. In this podcast, Dr. J demonstrates the value of the add-on HB and GNT syntactical databases. He also offers guidance in how to use Syntax Trees, perform syntactical Word Searches, and hone our syntactical Construct Searches. A working knowledge of Greek or Hebrew will help viewers get the most out of this episode. http://accordancefiles2.com/podcasts/p135_syntax.mp4
  6. Hello. I find the syntax searches very interesting, although I have to say that I would prefer that all the syntax where divided into standard categories like: subject, direct object, indirect objekt, conditional clause etc, and not the confusing (and very broad) categories like predicate and adjunct. Perhaps this function is genius and I'ts just me not understanding the how to use it ? Well, my question is: How can I find all the genitives in NA28 which functions as a direct object?
  7. Hi! I watched Dr. J's Greek Searching Webinar yesterday (though I was only a couple hours removed from a procedure that involved anesthesia). A former student sent me a request, which sent me to Accordance (former hard-core Logos user). I wanted to do a search from all 2nd person imperative forms of Greek verbal lexemes terminating in -ιζω. Through the search menu, I created the following search: [VERB second singular (aorist, present) imperative] What I would like to do is the limit that search to Greek verbs whose lexemes end in -ιζω. Is there a way to do that? I thank each one of you in advance.
  8. Hello everyone, I've previously reported on an issue related Greek syntax search and the resulted word counts: https://www.accordancebible.com/forums/topic/18783-word-count-for-direct-speech-does-not-work/ Unfortunately, I'm stilling having problems with the results of the word count in Accordance after I've done a syntax search. I’m trying to do a very simple search, but the statistics don’t cohere with the data displayed in the text window (see screenshot attached). I would very much appreciate any comments or corrections, since I'm not sure whether this is a bug in Accordance or I've just missed something. Thanks in advance, Daniel
  9. I was so pleased to see the GNT28-T Syntax Module show up in my update window this morning. I am so excited! Thank you, Marco! I am grateful for all the hard work that has been put in on both the Hebrew and Greek modules. What a tremendous undertaking! Thank you, Robert for all your work as well! These modules are a great blessing. Blessings in Christ, Mike Paulïnia, Brazil
  10. In the Library Window, Accordance 12 add Syntax and Diagram. Clicking the "i" button (i for information; About This Text in the gear menu) brings up the floating window (About This Text) for modules. Nothing happens when it is clicked for items in Syntax and Diagram. macOS 10.12.1, Accordance 12.0.0 for Mac.
  11. Hi I’m trying to search for the number of words in a direct speech sentence, but whatever I tried somehow Accordance does not recognize and does not count certain words in a direct speech sentence (see screenshot). I don't know if that happened only after the 11.2 update or before, because I only tried doing it after the update was installed. Is it a bug and can it be fixed with the next update? Thanks, Daniel
  12. Fabian

    Westminster Hebrew Syntax

    Hello Will the Westminster Hebrew Syntax come too to Accordance? Greetings Fabian
  13. How (if possible) would I do a search for occurrences of the definite direct objects where the object marker את does not occur? Any help or info appeciated. Thanks Jimmy Doyle
  14. In Greek, some conjunctions can be used with different kinds of dependent Clauses. This is the case with ὅτι, that is found in Complement, Subject, Appositive, or Adjunct Clauses. An Adjunct Clause introduced by ὅτι is usually a causal Clause. Thanks to the syntax add-on to GNT28-T, we can easily sort out the ὅτι Clauses according to their syntactical function. We will need to prepare four different searches. We will search first for Adjunct Clauses introduced by ὅτι. We will proceed as follows: Open a new Search Text window, choose GNT28-T as search text Click two times on the + to upper right of the Search Text, and choose to search for Words (not Verses) within every Chapter or Book (not Verse, etc) Open a new Greek Construct window (Command-2), that will be automatically linked with the Search Text In the Greek Construct window, drag the green item CLAUSE and drop it into the first column When prompted, choose Dependent clause only, then Adjunct, then click OK or press Return Drag the blue LEX item and drop it into the first column When prompted, go to ὅτι, then click OK or press Return Press Return or click on the Search button to perform the search The results will look like this: We have found Adjunct Clauses introduced by ὅτι. Such clauses are causal.
  15. Marco V. Fabbri

    Search for Result Clauses

    If you have the syntax module, the search for Result Clauses is made easier. Within the books that are ready, you will be able to find all the instances of dependent clause that start with ὥστε. You need to: open a Search window and set it to GNT28-T go to right top of the Search Window and press +, until an option to select the Scope appears select Chapter or Book open a new Greek Construct window, that will be linked with the main Search window in the Construct window, select a green Clause item from the left column and drop it into the blank space you will be prompted to choose what kind of clause you want: select dependent and adjunct select a blue LEX item and drop it into the Clause, choosing the first column of the Clause when prompted, enter ὥστε press Return or hit the search button The result will look like this: If you want the Clause Verb to be in the Infinitive Mood only, you will need to modify the previous search, adding the following select a purple Verb item and drop it into the second column of the Clause Adjun. DEPENDENT Clause when prompted, select Mood: Infinitive press Return or hit the search button If you want the Clause Verb to be in the Indicative Mood only, you will need to modify the previous search, adding the following select a purple Verb item and drop it into the second column of the Adjun. DEPENDENT Clause when prompted, select Mood: Indicative press Return or hit the search button
  16. Coming from the "other guys" bible software I'm used to doing certain things a certain way, and I realize that I'll have to relearn a LOT of things. One thing that I'd like to be able to do is construct a syntax search. I checked out the help file but it's a lot easier to watch someone do it and talk about it. Would you do a podcast on doing simple constructs in english and greek/hebrew? One example that I had in mind was the answer to this question: Find any clause where God is the subject but not necessarily referred to by the word "God" Or another example; Find all the places where God is the subject and displays an emotion. (again, not a simple "God" word search. Does this make sense?
  17. I'm new to Accordance but I'm wondering; how easy is it to do syntax searching? Example: Any clause where God is the subject and X is the verb. Why I'm wondering this is where there are references to God such as "He" that aren't picked up by just searching "God" and some verb. Does this make sense?
  18. I cannot figure out how to access the syntax modules under Accordance 10. I couldn't find any help on it so I am here hoping someone knows. Can anyone pass along the procedure? Thanks in advance for your help.
  19. Brian K. Mitchell

    Westminster Hebrew Syntax

    "The Westminster Hebrew Syntax is a new database project that has been in development for the past five years, and is nearly ready for distribution. Syntax is the analysis of whole thoughts, clauses, and their parts, phrases. Syntax, far more than the study of individual words, is the study of the meaning of the text." http://www.grovescenter.org/GC/projects http://www.grovescenter.org/bugzilla/describecomponents.cgi?product=WHS I wonder if Accordance will acquire this database in the future and how it will compare with Syntax Database Accordance already has?
  20. version 10.2 announcement of new things says you can see syntax tags after doing the analysis of a word. I followed the example of theos with same number of words found, 1317. but when customizing the search for syntax, it does not show those results. Simply says it is "untagged." But I am using GNT-T, same as the example on Accordance website. What am I doing wrong?
  21. Hi, I'm a relatively new accordance user, and very new to the syntax module - having only bought it two days ago. Which is to say that I could be completely wrong about this; but I just can't see how Gen 39:5 can possibly be correctly diagrammed in the syntax module. Should not the wayyiqtol ויברך be attached to the clause after it, not preceding it? As it stands, there are no verbs in the non-dependent mainline clause. (See image attached.) If I am incorrect, and Gen 39:5 is properly diagrammed (which is entirely possible), then can someone please explain to me how this verse is working and why the mainline wayyiqtol verb is labelled as adjunct? Thanks, Nathan
  22. Hi! Wondering if sentence diagramming functionality is being planned for ios? Will we also be able to view syntax information tagged to original texts? Thank you
  23. Without the syntax, we could search for an Accusative and an Infinitive, but we would have hit any Accusative, not only those that are subject of a clause. Most of them would be complements, not subject. By involving the syntax in the search, we can specify that we only want those Accusatives that are also Subject. Searches for the Accusative and Infinitive in the GNT28-T syntax can be at the same time powerful and easy to prepare. They can be performed in the Search Text window alone, or in the Greek construct window. The Greek construct is necessary when we want the elements of the search to belong to the same Clause. I. Searching for Subject Accusatives and Infinitives in the Search text In the Search Text window, we need to enter: [subject] @ [ANY accusative]<AND>[VERB infinitive] The search can be entered manually, or can be copied and pasted, or can be built step by step using the Menu Search: Enter Tag. The results will look like this: If we examine the results, we will see many good hits, and it will be apparent that the Accusative and Infinitive has many different uses. We will also notice that some hits don't actually contain any Accusative and Infinitive. So is the second hit: Matthew 3:7, which is not relevant. Here the Accusative πολλούς and the Infinitive φυγεῖν do not belong to the same Clause. As Accordance searched in any verse, it just happened to find a Subject Accusative and an Infinitive in the same verse. If we want to make sure that the Accusative and the Infinitive belong to the same Clause, we will need the Greek Construct window. II. Searching for Accusative and Infinitive in any Dependent Clause The steps will be: Open a new Search Text, choose GNT28-T as search text, and set the search to WORDS (not VERSES) Click on the + mark in the upper right corner, to reveal more options Click again on the + mark in the upper right corner, to reveal even more options, and set the Scope to Chapter or Book (not Verse, Clause, Sentence, or Paragraph) Open a new Greek Construct (Command-2), that will be automatically linked with the Search Text In the Greek Construct window, choose the green CLAUSE item, drag and drop it into the first column When prompted, choose Dependent Clause only, then Any, then click OK (or press Return) Choose the purple Verb item and drop it into the first column of the DEPENDENT Clause When prompted, choose Mood: Infinitive, then click OK (or press Return) Choose the purple Subject item and drop it into the second column of the DEPENDENT Clause When prompted, choose Simple, then click OK (or press Return) Choose the purple ANY item and drop it into the same column that already contains the Subject element When prompted, type Accusative, then click OK Select the box Search both directions, in the right lower corner of the window (we do so that it doesn't matter whether the Subject is found before the Infinitive, or the Infinitive is found before the Subject). Press Return, or click on the Search button. The result will look like this: If we examine the results, we will see that the number of hits has decreased. The non-relevant hits are gone. We will also notice again the many different uses of the Accusative and Infinitive, and we may now narrow the search to Complement Clauses, or to Subject Clauses, or to Adjunct Clauses. Let's try all of them. III. Searching for Accusative and Infinitive in Complement Dependent Clauses We can use the existing search and modify it. The steps will be: In the Greek Construct window, double-click on the green DEPENDENT element When prompted to Select type of clause, choose Complement, then click OK (or press Return) Press Return, or click on the Search button. The result will look like this: If we examine the results we will find that some of the Clauses are Complement of a Predicate, such as Matthew 8:22; 13:30; 14:19; 14:28, 16:13; etc. These are the most characteristic Accusative with infinitive Clauses. But we will also find some Clauses that are Complement to a preposition, such as Matthew 6:8; 13:4; 13:25; etc. IV. Searching for Accusative and Infinitive in Subject Dependent Clauses An Accusative and Infinitive construct may be found also as a Subject Dependent Clause. We can use the existing search and modify it. The steps will be: In the Greek Construct window, double-click on the green DEPENDENT element When prompted to Select type of clause, choose Subject, then click OK (or press Return) Press Return, or click on the search button. The result will look like this: If we examine the results, we will find that the Subject Clause works as the subject of δεῖ, or καλόν ἐστιν, or ἀνάγκη (ἐστίν understood), etc. V. Searching for Accusative and Infinitive in Adjunct Dependent Clauses An Accusative and Infinitive construct may be found also as an Adjunct Dependent Clause. This can happen in some Adverbial Clauses. Among them, we find some Clauses that we use to call Result Clauses, because of the semantics of the conjunction ὥστε that introduces them. Or we find Clauses that we call (Subsequent) Time Clauses, because of the semantics of the conjunction πρίν that introduces them. We can use the existing search and modify it. The steps will be: In the Greek Construct window, double-click on the green DEPENDENT element When prompted to Select the type of dependent clause, choose Adjunct only, then click OK (or press Return) Press Return, or click on the search button. The result will look like this: If we examine the results, we notice a few a (Subsequent) Time Clauses (Matthew 1:18; 26:34; 26:75), and several Result Clauses (Matthew 8:24; 8:28; 12:22; 13:2; 13:32; etc.) VI. Searching for Accusative and Infinitive in Apposition Dependent Clauses An Accusative and Infinitive construct may be found also as an Apposition Dependent Clause. We can use the existing search and modify it. The steps will be: In the Greek Construct window, double-click on the green DEPENDENT item When prompted to Select the type of dependent clause, choose Apposition only, then click OK (or press Return) Press Return, or click on the search button. The result will look like this: The results also include Ephesians, 1Thessalonians and Hebrews that I haven't released yet.
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